Chimborazo

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 1.464°S
  • 78.815°W

  • 6310 m
    20697 ft

  • 352071
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Chimborazo.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Chimborazo.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Chimborazo.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0550 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
0270 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)
2500 BCE ± 1500 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
4130 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)
5410 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)
7500 BCE ± 2500 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology

The Global Volcanism Program has no synonyms or subfeatures listed for Chimborazo.

Photo Gallery


Clouds drape glacier-clad, 6310-m-high Chimborazo, Ecuador's highest volcano. Chimborazo anchors the southern end of the country's "Avenue of Volcanoes" 30 km NW of the city of Riobamba. The volcano is mostly of Pliocene-to-Pleistocene age, but recent work has shown that it remained active into the Holocene. The volcano is composed of three edifices along an east-west line, the youngest and westernmost of which forms the current summit of Chimborazo.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1978 (Smithsonian Insitution).
See title for photo information.
Glacier-clad, 6310-m-high Chimborazo is Ecuador's highest volcano. It is seen here from the NE with Carihuairazo volcano forming the lower, mostly snow-free peak to the left. The youngest and westernmost of three edifices constructed along an E-W line forms the current summit of Chimborazo. Although activity was once thought to have ceased during the very latest Pleistocene, recent work indicates that Chimborazo erupted several times during the Holocene.

Photo by Patricio Ramon, 2004 (Instituto Geofisca, Escuela Politecnica Nacional).
See title for photo information.
An erosional unconformity cutting diagonally across the center of the photo due to a glacial advance about 20,000-18,000 years ago separates two sequences of late-Pleistocene tephra layers from Ecuador's Chimborazo volcano. A less prominent unconformity below the light-colored tephra layer at the top of the sequence marks a 16,000-14,000 year old glacial advance. This ~12-m-thick exposure lies on the SW flank of Chimborazo, Ecuador's highest volcano.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2006 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Chimborazo in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites