Santa Cruz

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 0.62°S
  • 90.33°W

  • 864 m
    2834 ft

  • 353091
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Santa Cruz.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Santa Cruz.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Santa Cruz.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Santa Cruz. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Santa Cruz page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The highlands of the broad Santa Cruz shield volcano, seen here from the NE, are capped by youthful cinder cones with well-preserved craters. The scoria cones are grouped in an E-W belt parallel to recent fault scarps that border Academy Bay and largely bury a shallow summit caldera. Older uplifted submarine lava flows are found on the NE part of the island and at the fault-delimited offshore island of Baltra. No historical eruptions are known from Santa Cruz, the 2nd-most populated island of the Galápagos archipelago.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1978 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
Lava flows line the steep walls of a pit crater on Santa Cruz island. Note the person standing on the rim at the right for scale. Pit craters are formed by collapse following the withdrawal of magma along a rift zone. They differ from other craters in that their rims lack a mantle of explosive debris. In some cases, vertical-walled pit craters can be hundreds of meters deep.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1978 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
The broad shield volcano forming Santa Cruz Island is seen from its northern coast. The oval-shaped, 32 x 40 km wide island is capped by cinder cones with well-preserved craters that largely bury a shallow summit caldera. The highland scoria cones are grouped along an E-W belt parallel to recent fault scarps that border Academy Bay, location of the Charles Darwin Research Station.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2006 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


The following 1 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections. Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description
NMNH 118133-1 E

Affiliated Sites