Putana

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 22.557°S
  • 67.853°W

  • 5884 m
    19300 ft

  • 355090
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Putana.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Putana.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Putana.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History


There is data available for 2 Holocene eruptive periods.


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1972 Jul 2 ± 182 days ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1810 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations

Deformation History


There is data available for 1 deformation periods. Expand each entry for additional details.


Deformation during 2009 Sep 13 - 2010 Jan 31 [Uplift; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 2009 Sep 13 Stop Date: 2010 Jan 31 Direction: Uplift Method: InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: 5.00 km Latitude: -23.000 Longitude: -68.000

Remarks: Short-lived deformation at Putana occurred sometime between 13 September 2009 and 31 January 2010.

Selection of interferograms showing uplift at Putana Volcano (located within the black circular marker). Black triangles are volcanic edifices from de Silva and Francis [1991], red triangles are Holocene volcanos from Siebert et al. [2011], and purple stars mark the location of geyser fields. The deformation is persistent on various dates and similar amplitude uplift signals are not apparent on neighboring edifices, suggesting a non-atmospheric origin. Based on this collection of interferograms, and local seismic data, we ascertain the deformation was short lived and occurred sometime between 13 September 2009 and 31 January 2010.

From: Henderson and Pritchard 2013.


Reference List: Henderson and Pritchard 2013.

Full References:

Henderson, S. T., and M. E. Pritchard, 2013. Decadal volcanic deformation in the central Andes volcanic zone revealed by InSAR time series. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 14, doi:10.1002.ggge.20074.

Emission History


There is no Emissions History data available for Putana.

Photo Gallery


The area around Volcán Putana is seen from the west in this sketch. Putana is part of a large, roughly N-S-trending volcanic complex that covers an area of 600 sq km. Vigorous fumarolic activity (depicted in this sketch) is visible at the 5890-m-high summit of Putana volcano from long distances. The main edifice consists of accumulated postglacial dacitic lava domes and flows mantling an older pre-Holocene volcano. Young dark-colored flows in this sketch descend the western flanks of the volcano.

Sketch by Oscar González-Ferrán (University of Chile).
See title for photo information.
Putana volcano, also known as Jorgencal or Machuca, lies in the center of this Landsat image. Snow-covered areas are deep blue in this image of the N-S-trending volcanic complex, which covers an area of 600 sq km. The main edifice consists of accumulated postglacial dacitic lava domes and flows mantling an older pre-Holocene volcano. The youngest basaltic andesite lava flows are viscous and rarely extend more than 3 km. The prominent fan-shaped lava flow at the upper left originated from a flank vent.

NASA Landsat image, 1999 (courtesy of Hawaii Synergy Project, Univ. of Hawaii Institute of Geophysics & Planetology).
See title for photo information.
Volcán Putana, seen here from the west, shows vigorous fumarolic activity at its 5890-m-high summit. Snow forming a thin diagonal line below and to the right of the summit marks a road leading to a sulfur-mining operation at the summit of the volcano. Putana is also known as Jorgencal or Machuca and is part of a large, roughly N-S-trending volcanic complex that covers an area of 600 sq km along the Chile-Bolivia border. Postglacial dacitic lava domes and short, thick lava flows form the main edifice.

Photo by Joël Boyer, 2006 (L.A.V.E.)
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Putana in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites