Aracar

Photo of this volcano
  • Argentina
  • South America
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown - Evidence Credible
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 24.29°S
  • 67.783°W

  • 6095 m
    19992 ft

  • 355160
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Bulletin Report: April 1993 (BGVN 18:04) Citation IconCite this Report


Ash column reported

A steam plume was observed rising above Arácar on 28 March. Viewed from the town of Tolar Grande, 50 km SE, the plume persisted throughout the clear day. At least twice during the day, a large ash column slowly rose 2,000 m above the summit. The following day clouds prevented a clear view of the volcano, but an "ashy haze" in the sky was noted. A local observer indicated that the activity was not unusual.

Arácar has a base 10 km in diameter. It is located just E of the Argentina-Chile border, ~ 100 km S of Lascar and 80 km NE of Llullaillaco volcanoes. No historical eruptions have been recorded. Moyra Gardeweg provided the following background. "It is clearly younger than the surrounding Miocene volcanoes. Its steep conical edifice has been cut by some deep gorges and an uncovered alteration zone lies close to its summit on the NE flank. It has a well-developed and well-preserved summit crater (1-1.5 km diameter) that contains a tiny lake. Lava flows are well preserved at the base of the cone (below 4,500-m elev), a common feature of Pliocene-to-Quaternary volcanoes in the Central Andes. I have no information about its exact age, but the good preservation of the summit crater and lava flows suggest that it could be Quaternary, although I can only assume it is Pliocene or younger."

Information Contacts: R. Trujillo, Colorado, USA; M. Gardeweg, SERNAGEOMIN, Santiago.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Aracar.

Bulletin Reports - Index


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

04/1993 (BGVN 18:04) Ash column reported




Information is preliminary and subject to change. All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


April 1993 (BGVN 18:04) Citation IconCite this Report


Ash column reported

A steam plume was observed rising above Arácar on 28 March. Viewed from the town of Tolar Grande, 50 km SE, the plume persisted throughout the clear day. At least twice during the day, a large ash column slowly rose 2,000 m above the summit. The following day clouds prevented a clear view of the volcano, but an "ashy haze" in the sky was noted. A local observer indicated that the activity was not unusual.

Arácar has a base 10 km in diameter. It is located just E of the Argentina-Chile border, ~ 100 km S of Lascar and 80 km NE of Llullaillaco volcanoes. No historical eruptions have been recorded. Moyra Gardeweg provided the following background. "It is clearly younger than the surrounding Miocene volcanoes. Its steep conical edifice has been cut by some deep gorges and an uncovered alteration zone lies close to its summit on the NE flank. It has a well-developed and well-preserved summit crater (1-1.5 km diameter) that contains a tiny lake. Lava flows are well preserved at the base of the cone (below 4,500-m elev), a common feature of Pliocene-to-Quaternary volcanoes in the Central Andes. I have no information about its exact age, but the good preservation of the summit crater and lava flows suggest that it could be Quaternary, although I can only assume it is Pliocene or younger."

Information Contacts: R. Trujillo, Colorado, USA; M. Gardeweg, SERNAGEOMIN, Santiago.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1993 Mar 28 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Steep-sided Aracar stratovolcano rises to 6028 m just east of the Argentina-Chile border. The light-colored Salar de Pular and Sala de Incahuasi appear at the upper left and right, respectively, in this NASA Space Shuttle image with north to the upper right. Well-preserved lava flows are visible on the lower flanks below 4500 m elevation, and several satellitic cones are found at the base of the volcano. Prior to a report of possible ash columns from the summit in 1993, the volcano was not known to be active.

NASA Space Shuttle image ISS006-E-13813, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Aracar in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites