Antuco

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 37.406°S
  • 71.349°W

  • 2979 m
    9771 ft

  • 357080
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Weekly Report: 24 April-30 April 2013


The Buenos Aires VAAC reported that only gas and steam rose from Antuco on 20 April; although a pilot reported ash emissions, ash was not identified in satellite imagery or by web camera during clear skies.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


Most Recent Bulletin Report: May 1992 (BGVN 17:05)


Fumarolic activity in summit crater's small scoria cone

During a February overflight, fumarolic activity was visible in the small scoria cone nested within the main crater. Weak summit fumaroles had previously been observed during visits in 1969, 1982, and March 1984. Fumarolic activity has apparently been continuous, but of variable intensity, from the cone since the volcano's last eruption in 1869. Lava flows from Antuco dammed Laja Lake's outlet in 1853, causing the water level to rise around 20 m.

Information Contacts: H. Moreno, SAVO, Temuco.

Index of Weekly Reports


2013: April

Weekly Reports


24 April-30 April 2013

The Buenos Aires VAAC reported that only gas and steam rose from Antuco on 20 April; although a pilot reported ash emissions, ash was not identified in satellite imagery or by web camera during clear skies.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


Index of Bulletin Reports


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

05/1992 (BGVN 17:05) Fumarolic activity in summit crater's small scoria cone




Bulletin Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.


05/1992 (BGVN 17:05) Fumarolic activity in summit crater's small scoria cone

During a February overflight, fumarolic activity was visible in the small scoria cone nested within the main crater. Weak summit fumaroles had previously been observed during visits in 1969, 1982, and March 1984. Fumarolic activity has apparently been continuous, but of variable intensity, from the cone since the volcano's last eruption in 1869. Lava flows from Antuco dammed Laja Lake's outlet in 1853, causing the water level to rise around 20 m.

Information Contacts: H. Moreno, SAVO, Temuco.
Download or Cite this Report

Antuco volcano, constructed to the NE of the Pleistocene Sierra Velluda stratovolcano, rises dramatically above the SW shore of Laguna de la Laja. Antuco has a complicated history beginning with construction of the basaltic-to-andesitic Sierra Veluda and Cerro Condor stratovolcanoes of Pliocene-Pleistocene age. Construction of the Antuco I volcano was followed by edifice failure at the beginning of the Holocene that produced a large debris avalanche which traveled down the Río Laja to the west and left a large 5-km-wide horseshoe-shaped caldera breached to the west. The steep-sided modern basaltic-to-andesitic cone of has grown 1000 m since then; flank fissures and cones have also been active. Moderate explosive eruptions were recorded in the 18th and 19th centuries from both summit and flank vents, and historical lava flows have traveled into the Río Laja drainage.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1972 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1929 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1869 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1863 Dec Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1862 Jan ] [ 1862 Mar 3 ] Uncertain    
1861 Feb (?) 1861 Aug (?) Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1852 Nov 1853 Jan Confirmed 3 Historical Observations NE flank fissure and summit
[ 1848 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1845 Feb 26 1845 Mar 1 (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1839 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1828 Dec 18 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1820 1821 (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1806 May (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1752 Jan 31 1752 Feb 1 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1750 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
7750 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Antojo | Antoco | Laxa | Laja

Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Condor, Cerro Stratovolcano
Pangues, Los Cone
Velluda, Sierra Stratovolcano 3585 m 37° 28' 0" S 71° 24' 47" W

Craters

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Henedura, La Crater
Antuco volcano rises dramatically above the shores of Laguna de la Laja. Edifice failure at the beginning of the Holocene created a large horseshoe-shaped caldera whose NW rim forms the ridge descending diagonally across the photo to the right. The steep-sided modern basaltic cone has grown 1000 m since then, producing fresh-looking lava flows with prominent levees that have overtopped the caldera rim and reached the lake shore in the foreground. The most recent eruptions of Antuco occurred during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Photo by Hugo Moreno (University of Chile).
Antuco volcano, seen here from the NW, has a complicated history beginning with construction of an andesitic stratovolcano during the Pleistocene. Edifice failure at the beginning of the Holocene produced a large debris avalanche that traveled down the Río Laja to the west. The collapse left a large horseshoe-shaped caldera whose NW rim forms the ridge descending to the right. The steep-sided modern basaltic cone (upper right) has grown 1000 m since then. Moderate explosive eruptions were recorded in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Photo by Norm Banks, 1990 (U.S. Geological Survey).
The snow-capped modern summit of 2979-m-high Antuco volcano rises above the rim of a large horseshoe-shaped caldera, whose WNW rim forms the flat ridge just above the snow line. The caldera was formed by collapse of an older Antuco volcano at the beginning of the Holocene. The 1-km-high modern cone subsequently grew at the head of the scarp. Eruptions from both summit and flank vents have occurred during the 19th and 20th centuries.

Photo by Norm Banks, 1990 (U.S. Geological Survey).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Casertano L, 1963a. Chilean Continent. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 15: 1-55.

Hildreth W, Moorbath S, 1988. Crustal contribution to arc magmatism in the Andes of central Chile. Contr Mineral Petr, 98: 455-489.

Lopez-Escobar L, Vergara M, Frey F A, 1981. Petrology and geochemistry of lavas from Antuco volcano, a basaltic volcano of the southern Andes (37° 25' S). J Volc Geotherm Res, 11: 329-352.

Moreno H, 1974. Airplane flight over active volcanoes of central-south Chile. Internatl Symp Volc Andean & Antarctic Volc Problems Guidebook, Excur D-3, 56 p.

Moreno H, Naranjo J A, 1991. The southern Andes volcanoes (33°-41° 30' S), Chile. 6th Geol Cong Chile, Excur PC-3, 26 p.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Somma
Pyroclastic cone

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
117
474
3,872
381,623

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Antuco Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.