Maca

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 45.1°S
  • 73.17°W

  • 2960 m
    9709 ft

  • 358056
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Maca.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Maca.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Maca.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1560 ± 110 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) SW flank (Bahía Pérez)
0410 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) MAC1 tephra

The Global Volcanism Program has no synonyms or subfeatures listed for Maca.

Photo Gallery


Volcán Macá, the highest volcano between Lanín and Lautaro, rises to 2960 m NW of Puerto Aisén. Little is known of the geologic history of this glacier-covered stratovolcano, which contains a summit lava dome and flank cinder cones.

Photo by John Davidson, University of Michigan (courtesy of Hugo Moreno, University of Chile).
See title for photo information.
Volcán Cay (upper left), is located east of Macá volcano (lower right) and NW of the town of Puerto Aisén. The basaltic and dacitic stratovolcano has an explosion crater that is open to the east, and about a half dozen explosion craters and pyroclastic cones lie along a fissure trending SW of the summit. Another 10 basaltic pyroclastic cones are located along second parallel fissure 5 km to the SE that is part of the major regional Liquiñe-Ofqui fault zone.

Photo by Oscar González-Ferrán (University of Chile).
See title for photo information.
Snow-mantled Volcán Maca, the highest volcano between Lanín and Lautaro, rises to 2960 m NW of Puerto Aisén. This glacier-covered, basaltic-to-andesitic stratovolcano lies within a caldera and contains a summit lava dome. Five flank cinder cones and lava domes lie along a NE-trending fissure that extends 15 km from the summit. The volcano lies along the regional Liquiñe-Ofqui fault zone. Volcan Cay (far right) lies to the NE of Maca.

Photo by Oscar González-Ferrán (University of Chile).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Maca in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites