Ljosufjoll

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 64.87°N
  • 22.23°W

  • 1063 m
    3487 ft

  • 370030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Ljosufjoll.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Ljosufjoll.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Ljosufjoll.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0960 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Anthropology Raudhalsar
0665 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Ytri and Stóri Raudamelskula
1750 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Grábrók
2050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology Krothraunskula, Raudakúla, Graakula
7050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Eldborg

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


This vertical aerial photo, with south to the top, shows the symmetrical Graakula cinder cone at the lower left, which erupted about 4000 years ago and produced a lava flow that entered Selvallavatn lake. The flow is part of the Ljósufjöll volcanic system, which is composed of a group of cinder cones and lava flows along short fissures on a roughly 90-km-long WNW-ESE line. The latest eruption at Ljósufjöll post-dated the settlement of Iceland, and took place about 1000 years ago.

Photo by Landmælingar Islands, courtesy of Jack Green (published in Green and Short, 1971).
See title for photo information.
The Ljósufjöll volcanic system at the eastern end of the Snæfellsnes Peninsula is composed of a group of cinder cones and lava flows erupted along short fissures on a roughly 90-km-long WNW-ESE line. The crest of the Ljósufjöll range is seen here from the south with glacial moraines descending its flanks. The latest eruption at Ljósufjöll post-dated the settlement of Iceland, and took place about 1000 years ago.

Photo by Oddur Sigurdsson, 1983 (Icelandic National Energy Authority).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Ljosufjoll in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites