Hrómundartindur

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 64.083°N
  • 21.333°W

  • 550 m
    1804 ft

  • 371051
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Hrómundartindur.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Hrómundartindur.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Hrómundartindur.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History


The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Hrómundartindur. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Hrómundartindur page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

Deformation History


There is data available for 1 deformation periods. Expand each entry for additional details.


Deformation during 1993 - 1998 [Variable (uplift / horizontal); Observed by GPS, InSAR]

Start Date: 1993 Stop Date: 1998 Direction: Variable (uplift / horizontal) Method: GPS, InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: Unknown Latitude: Unknown Longitude: Unknown

Remarks: Uplift near the Hengill triple junction is associated with an earthquake swarm.

Observed interferograms of the Hengill area for four different time intervals. The time interval appears in the upper right corner of each panel; the orbit numbers appear at lower left; and the altitude of ambiguity ha appears at lower right. One fringe represents 28 mm of range change. Two concentric fringes are visible in the 4-year interferogram (d) indicating at least 6 cm of uplift between August 1993 and August 1997.

From: Feigl et al. 2000.


Reference List: Feigl et al. 2000; Sigmundsson et al. 1997b.

Full References:

Feigl, K.L., Gasperi, J., Sigmundsson, F. and Rigo, A.,, 2000. Crustal deformation near Hengill volcano, Iceland 1993-1998: Coupling between magmatic activity and faulting inferred from elastic modeling of satellite radar interferograms. J. Geophys. Res., 105(B11), pp.25655-25670.

Sigmundsson, F., Einarsson, P., Rognvaldsson, S.T., Foulger, G.R., Hodgkinson, K.M. and Thorbergsson, G.,, 1997. The 1994-1995 seismicity and deformation at the Hengill triple junction, Iceland: Triggering of earthquakes by minor magma injection in a zone of horizontal shear stress. . J. Geophys. Res., 102(B7), pp.15151-15161.

Emission History


There is no Emissions History data available for Hrómundartindur.

Photo Gallery


Steam rises from a hot pool in the Olkeduháls geothermal area of the Hrómundartindur volcanic system, which lies south of Thingvallavatn lake. The Olkeduháls geothermal field contains numerous hot springs, mud pools, fumaroles, and mineral warm springs. The Hengill volcanic system forms the ridge on the skyline immediately west of the Hrómundartindur volcanic system.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2008 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.
A group of volcanologists on a field trip observe activity at the Olkeduháls geothermal field of the Hrómundartindur volcanic system. This small volcanic system lies at a ridge-ridge-transform triple junction at the eastern end of the Reykjanes Peninsula, where the west Iceland volcanic zone changes direction from approximately W-E to SW-NE. The latest eruptions at Hrómundartindur took place at the end of the latest glacial period, but Hrómundartindur displays vigorous geothermal activity at the Olkeduháls geothermal field.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2008 (Smithsonian Institution).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Hrómundartindur in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites