Hveravellir

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 64.75°N
  • 19.98°W

  • 1360 m
    4461 ft

  • 371080
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Hveravellir.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Hveravellir.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Hveravellir.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0950 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Hallmundahraun
2050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Radiocarbon (corrected) Lambahraun
2550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Tephrochronology Krákshraun
3550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Tephrochronology Strytuhraun
5850 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Kjalhraun
8600 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Tephrochronology Leggjarbrjotur

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The Geysir thermal area, containing Iceland's largest geysers, lies in the Haukadalur basin, near the southern end of the lengthy fissure system extending from Hveravellir central volcano. Hveravellir volcano occupies the NE half of the massive Langjökull icecap. A summit caldera lies beneath the ice. Postglacial lava flows flank Langjökull on the northern, western, and eastern sides. The massive Hallmundahraun lava flow, which covers 200 sq km, was erupted shortly after 900 CE.

Photo by Bill Rose, 1975 (Michigan Technological University).
See title for photo information.
Iceland's largest geysers are located in the Haukadalur basin, at the southern end of a fissure system extending from Hveravellir central volcano. Two geysers remain active, Strockur and Smid. Strockur geyser has not built a geyserite cone, but its rim is surrounded by a pool of water. The geyser erupts every 10-15 minutes with a short-lived burst that throws steam and water to heights of 20 m or more.

Photo by Bill Rose, 1975 (Michigan Technological University).
See title for photo information.
Hveravellir volcano occupies the NE half of the massive Langjökull icecap, which is seen here in an aerial view from the north with Hvítárvatn lake on the opposite side reflecting the sun. A summit caldera lies beneath the ice. One of the most prominent of a series of small shield volcanoes and postglacial lava flows flanking Langjökull produced the massive Hallmundahraun lava flow, which covers 200 sq km, and was erupted shortly after 900 CE. The Geysir thermal area, containing Iceland's largest geysers, lies in the Haukadalur basin.

Photo by Oddur Sigurdsson, 1990 (Icelandic National Energy Authority).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Hveravellir in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites