Siple

Photo of this volcano
  • Antarctica
  • Antarctica
  • Shield
  • Unknown - Evidence Uncertain
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 73.43°S
  • 126.67°W

  • 3110 m
    10201 ft

  • 390025
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Weekly Report: 20 June-26 June 2012 Citation IconCite this Report


Infrared imagery from the Metop satellite showed a possible rising steam plume from the area of Siple on 20 June. The imagery, as interpreted by Mark Drapes, indicated that the volcano was about -22 degrees Celsius, about 6 degrees warmer that the surrounding landscape, and the base of the plume was about -55 degrees Celsius. [Correction: Further investigation and/or analysis of satellite imagery by Philip Kyle (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology), Paul Morin (University of Minnesota), and Matthew Lazzara (University of Wisconsin) confirmed that an eruption did not occur.]

Sources: EUMETSAT, Mark Drapes


Most Recent Bulletin Report: February 1992 (Ref 1992)


No evidence of activity

[A 25 February 1992 overflight during clear weather by a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter revealed no evidence of activity at Mt. Siple. No ash was visible on the surface, and no active fumaroles or fumarolic ice towers could be seen.]

Information Contacts: P. Kyle, New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology.

Weekly Reports - Index


2012: June


20 June-26 June 2012 Citation IconCite this Report


Infrared imagery from the Metop satellite showed a possible rising steam plume from the area of Siple on 20 June. The imagery, as interpreted by Mark Drapes, indicated that the volcano was about -22 degrees Celsius, about 6 degrees warmer that the surrounding landscape, and the base of the plume was about -55 degrees Celsius. [Correction: Further investigation and/or analysis of satellite imagery by Philip Kyle (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology), Paul Morin (University of Minnesota), and Matthew Lazzara (University of Wisconsin) confirmed that an eruption did not occur.]

Sources: EUMETSAT; Mark Drapes


Bulletin Reports - Index


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

09/1988 (SEAN 13:9) Apparent ash plumes detected by satellite imagery

12/1988 (SEAN 13:12) Overflight shows no sign of recent eruption

02/1992 (Ref 1992) No evidence of activity




Information is preliminary and subject to change. All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


September 1988 (SEAN 13:9) Citation IconCite this Report


Apparent ash plumes detected by satellite imagery

Apparent ash plumes from Mt. Siple were detected by NOAA 10 satellite imagery (visible band, orbit 10406) on 18 September at 1301 and again on 4 October at 1534 (infrared and visible bands, orbit 10636). The 4 October plume extended ~160-170 km WNW and was well-defined, but it was uncertain whether the plume originated from the volcano's summit or base [but see 13:12]. A review of past LANDSAT images indicated a possible February 1988 ash deposit on the ice near the volcano. Michael Matson and George Stephens are currently applying additional satellite data aquisition and reduction techniques to refine these interpretations.

. . . Geologists hope to visit the volcano in November.

Information Contacts: W. Gould, M. Matson, and G. Stephens, NOAA; W. LeMasurier, Univ of Colorado.


December 1988 (SEAN 13:12) Citation IconCite this Report


Overflight shows no sign of recent eruption

Further analysis of satellite images by geologists strongly suggested that the plumes originated from the volcano's summit, rather than its base. On 30 December, Philip Kyle and William McIntosh conducted an aerial inspection of the snow-covered volcano. The weather was clear except for low clouds below 500 m, around the mountain's base. No fresh ash, new craters, disruptions to the snowpack, or other evidence of recent explosive volcanism were observed. Although appearing identical to known eruption clouds, Kyle believes that the Mt. Siple plumes resulted from meteorological effects.

Information Contacts: P. Kyle, New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology.


February 1992 (Ref 1992)


No evidence of activity

[A 25 February 1992 overflight during clear weather by a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter revealed no evidence of activity at Mt. Siple. No ash was visible on the surface, and no active fumaroles or fumarolic ice towers could be seen.]

Information Contacts: P. Kyle, New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Siple. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Siple page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Mount Siple rises to 3110 m and forms the high point of Siple Island in Marie Byrd Land off the coast of Antarctica. This aerial view is from the west, with dark-colored open water in the foreground and pack-ice-filled Pankratz Bay at the far right. Mount Siple has the largest exposed volume of volcanoes in this part of Antarctica because it lies outside the continental ice sheet. The exposed rock surface along the coast to the right of center is the young satellitic tuff cone of Lovill Bluff.

U. S. Navy photo TMA 1627 F33 088, 1985.
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Siple in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites