Farallon de Pajaros

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 20.538°N
  • 144.896°E

  • 360 m
    1181 ft

  • 284140
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Bulletin Report: June 1992 (BGVN 17:06) Citation IconCite this Report


Vigorous fuming

When observed from an airplane on 13 May, the volcano continued to fume vigorously, but no active lava was seen.

Information Contacts: R. Moore, USGS; R. Koyanagi, M. Sako, and F. Trusdell, HVO.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Farallon de Pajaros.

Bulletin Reports - Index


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

09/1981 (SEAN 06:09) Normal fuming and discolored water

10/1990 (BGVN 15:10) Vigorous fuming

06/1992 (BGVN 17:06) Vigorous fuming




Information is preliminary and subject to change. All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


September 1981 (SEAN 06:09) Citation IconCite this Report


Normal fuming and discolored water

"A 16 July USN flight also covered the Quaternary volcanoes of the Marianas. Fuming and discolored water were observed at Farallon de Pajaros but were not anomalous conditions."

Information Contacts: N. Banks, HVO.


October 1990 (BGVN 15:10) Citation IconCite this Report


Vigorous fuming

"Photographs taken by Civil Defense personnel in early August 1990 from a fixed-wing airplane showed vigorous fuming."

Information Contacts: R. Moore, USGS; R. Koyanagi and M. Sako, HVO.


June 1992 (BGVN 17:06) Citation IconCite this Report


Vigorous fuming

When observed from an airplane on 13 May, the volcano continued to fume vigorously, but no active lava was seen.

Information Contacts: R. Moore, USGS; R. Koyanagi, M. Sako, and F. Trusdell, HVO.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1967 Mar 27 1967 Apr 10 Confirmed 0 Hydrophonic SW of Uracas (Makhahnas seamount)
1952 Oct 26 ± 5 days 1953 Apr 15 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit, east side
1951 Aug Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1947 Jan (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations North side
1943 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit, south side
1941 Mar 28 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1939 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations East side ?
1936 Apr 15 ± 45 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1934 Jul 15 ± 45 days Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations Immediately south of Uracas
1932 Sep 7 1932 Oct 7 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit, east side ?
1928 Dec 15 ± 5 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1925 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1912 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations North side ?
1900 (?) 1901 May Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit, east side
1874 (?) 1876 Jan 3 (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit, NE side
[ 1865 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1864 Jan 7 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations SW side

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


Explosive activity was frequently observed from Farallon de Pajoras volcano in October and November 1952. Lava flows were emplaced on the east and west sides of the summit in February-March 1953. This 1953 photo from the east shows an eruption plume rising above the summit crater and lighter-gray lava flows in the center that were erupted in 1953. The lobe just left of center eventually reached the coast. Explosive activity continued until April 15. The steep-sided peak at the SE coastline is a remnant of an older caldera.

Photo by U.S. Navy, 1953.
See title for photo information.
The small 2-km-wide island of Farallon de Pajaros (Uracas) is the northernmost and most active volcano of the Mariana Islands. It has been referred to as the "Lighthouse of the western Pacific." The symmetrical, sparsely vegetated central cone lies within a caldera, remnants of which form the prominent peak seen here in 1980 at the center along the SE coast. Flank fissures from historical eruptions have fed lava flows that form platforms along the coast. Both summit and flank vents have been active during historical time.

Photo by Winfrey, 1980 (U.S. Navy).
See title for photo information.
The small island volcano of Farallón de Pájaros (Uracas) is surrounded by a series of lava flows erupted during historical time. This 1980 photo from the SE shows a blanket of unvegetated lava flows at the left that diverted around the prominent vegetated peak at the lower right. It is a remant of a caldera created prior to the formation of the present cone.

Photo by Winfrey (U.S. Navy), 1980.
See title for photo information.
Ahyi seamount (upper right) is a large conical submarine volcano that rises to within 137 m of the sea surface about 18 km SE of the island of Farallon de Pajaros (left-center). At various times since 1979, water discoloration, felt shocks followed by upwelling of sulfur-bearing water, and a seismically detected submarine eruption have been reported at or near Ahyi seamount. Two submarine volcanoes on the flanks of Farallon de Pajaros, Northwest Uracas and Makhahnas, are seen in this NOAA bathymetric image.

Image courtesy of NOAA, 2003 (http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/03fire/logs/mar02/media/nikko.html).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Farallon de Pajaros in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites