Zhupanovsky

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 53.589°N
  • 159.15°E

  • 2899 m
    9509 ft

  • 300120
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

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    Elevation

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Most Recent Weekly Report: 10 December-16 December 2014


KVERT reported that an eruption at Zhupanovsky continued during 5-12 December. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly on 9 December; the volcano was either quiet or obscured by clouds on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


Most Recent Bulletin Report: August 1993 (BGVN 18:08)


Fumarolic emissions from active crater

An overflight by members of SVE on 24 August 1993 revealed that significant fumarolic activity was present in the summit area. Fumarolic emissions were coming from the active crater, as well as from other parts of the summit ridge W of the second cone's crater. Yellow sulfur deposits were visible at several locations.

Information Contacts: H. Gaudru, SVE, Switzerland.

Index of Weekly Reports


2014: June | July | August | September | October | November | December
2013: October

Weekly Reports


10 December-16 December 2014

KVERT reported that an eruption at Zhupanovsky continued during 5-12 December. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly on 9 December; the volcano was either quiet or obscured by clouds on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 December-9 December 2014

KVERT reported that ash explosions at Zhupanovsky continued during 25 November-1 December. Ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 422 km E and SE during 28 November-1 December. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly during 28-29 November; the volcano was either quiet or obscured by clouds on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 November-2 December 2014

KVERT reported that strong explosions at Zhupanovsky were detected at 0206 on 23 November and 1214 on 25 November. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 7-8 km (23,000-26,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 350 km E on 22 November and SE during 25-27 November. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly over the volcano on 22, 25, and 27 November; cloud cover prevented views of the volcano on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 November-25 November 2014

KVERT reported that a moderate explosive eruption at Zhupanovsky likely continued during 14-21 November. Satellite images showed that the volcano was either quiet or obscured by clouds. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 November-18 November 2014

KVERT reported that moderate explosive eruptions at Zhupanovsky likely continued during 7-14 November. Satellite images detected ash plumes drifting 270 km SE during 7-10 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 November-11 November 2014

KVERT reported that a strong explosive eruption at Zhupanovsky occurred at 0955 on 8 November, generating an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 26 km SSW. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Orange. On 9 November ash plumes detected in satellite images rose to altitudes of 3-4 km (9,800-13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 190-250 km SE.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 October-4 November 2014

KVERT reported that the eruption at Zhupanovsky had likely finished in mid-October; satellite images last detected an explosion on 11 October and a thermal anomaly on 12 October. Volcanologists conducting an overflight on 17 October observed only gas-and-steam activity from the active crater. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 October-28 October 2014

KVERT reported that an eruption at Zhupanovsky likely continued during 17-24 October. Satellite images were obscured by clouds. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 October-21 October 2014

KVERT reported that an explosive eruption at Zhupanovsky continued during 10-17 October. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly on the volcano during 10-12 October, and ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 9 km (29,500 ft) a.s.l. on 11 October and drifted 411 km NE during 11-12 October. Cloud cover prevented satellite views of the volcano on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 October-14 October 2014

KVERT reported that an explosive eruption at Zhupanovsky continued during 3-10 October. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly on 3 and 9 October; cloud cover prevented views of the volcano on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 October-7 October 2014

KVERT reported that an explosive eruption at Zhupanovsky continued during 26 September-3 October. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly on 27 September, and ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-4.5 km (13,000-14,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 205 km E on 28 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 September-30 September 2014

KVERT reported that an explosive eruption at Zhupanovsky continued during 19-26 September. Ground-based observers noted ash plumes drifting SW to Avachinsky Bay during 23-24 September. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly during 18 and 23-24 September, as well as ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 3.5-4 km (11,500-13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 80 km SW and NE during 23-24 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 September-23 September 2014

KVERT reported that an explosive eruption at Zhupanovsky continued during 12-19 September. Volcanologists in Nalychevo Valley observed short-duration explosions on 13 September which generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 3.5-4 km (11,500-13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Satellite images detected a daily thermal anomaly and ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 3.5-4 km (11,500-13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 220 km SE and S during 13-14 and 16 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 September-16 September 2014

KVERT reported ashfall from Zhupanovsky in the area of IVS FEB RAS (Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky) during 1100-1300 on 7-8 September. The moderate explosive eruption continued and Alert Level Orange was maintained through the week of 12 September. According to visual data, ash plumes extended about 50 and 70 km S and SE of the volcano on 10 and 11 September, respectively. Persistent thermal anomalies were detected from the summit area based on satellite images during 4-5 and 10-11 September.

Satellite data showed ash plumes up to 3.5-4.0 km (11,500-13,100 ft) a.s.l. mainly during 9-11 September, and ash plumes drifted about 1,113 km SE and S.

According to the Tokyo VAAC, ash plumes were detected by satellite images during 10-16 September with the exception of 15 September. Plume heights were 2,400-3,700 m (8,000-12,000 ft) a.s.l..

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT); Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


3 September-9 September 2014

According to KVERT, the moderate explosive eruption of Zhupanovsky continued and Alert Level Orange was maintained through 8 September. On 1 September visual data detected an ash plume to an altitude of 3,500 m (11,500 ft) a.s.l. drifting NW of the volcano. Satellite data showed ash plumes at 3,500-4,000 m (11,500-13,100 ft) a.s.l. that extended about 85 km in various directions on 28 and 30 August and 1-4 September. Persistent thermal anomalies were detected from the summit area based on satellite images.

KVERT reported three ash plumes drifting SW on 7 September. The plumes were 10 km, 38 km, and 72 km long at 2,500-3,000 m (8,200-9,840 ft) a.s.l. On 8 September, satellite images revealed an ash plume extending 52 km SW from the volcano.

According to the Tokyo VAAC, ash plumes and possible ash plumes were detected by satellite images during 29 August-9 September with the exception of 5 and 6 September. Plume heights were 2,700-11,600 m (9,000-38,000 ft) a.s.l..

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT); Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 August-2 September 2014

KVERT reported that during 22-28 August the moderate explosive eruption continued at Zhupanovsky. On 28 August ash plumes rose to 3.5-4 km (11,500-13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 80 km SW. During 25-27 August satellite data showed a thermal anomaly over the volcano, but clouds prevented observations the other days of the week. The Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes rose to 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT); Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 August-26 August 2014

KVERT reported that during 15-21 August that moderate explosive eruption continued at Zhupanovsky. Satellite data showed a thermal anomaly over the volcano on 16-17 August. On 18 and 15 August the volcano was obscured by clouds. The Tokyo VAAC reported ash plumes rose to 3-4.5 km (10,000-15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S and SSE. On August 19 KVERT reported that satellite data showed ash plumes drifted 51 km S of the volcano and on August 20 that ash plumes rose to 3 km (9800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 110 km SSE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT); Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 August-19 August 2014

KVERT reported that during 8-14 August the moderate explosive eruption continued at Zhupanovsky. On 8 August staff of Volcanoes of Kamchatka Natural Park observed ash explosions twice an hour, with ash plumes rising up to 4 km (13,100 ft)a.s.l. drifting E. On 8 and 11-13 August satellite data showed that ash plumes rose to 4-4.5 km (13,100-14,800 ft)a.s.l. and drifted 80-100 km SE and NE Other days satellite data showed the volcano was obscured by clouds. On 12-13 August the Tokyo VAAC reported ash plumes to 3-4.9 km (10,000-16,000 ft) a.s.l that drifted SE, NE, and ESE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT); Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 August-12 August 2014

KVERT reported that during 1-7 August that the moderate explosive eruption continues at Zhupanovsky. On 6 August, KVERT reported an ash plume drifting 260 km ENE of the volcano. Most days satellite data showed the volcano was obscured by clouds.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 July-5 August 2014

KVERT reported that during 25 July-1 August the moderate explosive eruption continues at Zhupanovsky. On 27 July, satellite data showed ash plumes rose to 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. and extended 150 km N. The volcano was obscured by clouds 25 July-1 August. On 30 July Tokyo VAAC reported an ash plume rose 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT); Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 July-29 July 2014

KVERT reported that during 19-25 July the moderate explosive eruption continued at Zhupanovsky. On 18 and 21 July satellite data showed ash plumes that rose to 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. and extended about 30 and 70 km NE, respectively. A thermal anomaly was observed over the volcano on 19 and 21 July. Tokyo VAAC reported an ash plume on 27 July that rose to 8.5 km (28,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT); Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


16 July-22 July 2014

KVERT reported that on 15 July moderate gas-and-steam activity was observed at Zhupanovsky. On 16-17 July satellite data showed ash plumes that rose to 6-6.5 km (19,700-21,300 ft) a.s.l. and extended about 370 km N. A thermal anomaly was observed over the volcano on 16 July. The Tokyo VAAC reported ash plumes during 16-18 and 21 July drifting N and NE. Plume altitudes were in the range of 3.3-8.5 km (11,000-28,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT); Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 July-15 July 2014

KVERT reported that during 2, 5, and 9 July, moderate gas-and-steam activity was observed at Zhupanovsky. An ash plume up to 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. was observed on 9 July. Satellite data showed an ash plume extending up to 450 km E and SE of the volcano during 9-10 July. The Aviation Color Code was maintained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 June-1 July 2014

KVERT reported that during 20-26 June, moderate gas-and-steam activity was observed at Zhupanovsky. Satellite data showed ash plumes drifting 55 km NW from the volcano. During June 27-28 cloud cover prevented views from satellite. The Aviation Color Code is Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 June-24 June 2014

KVERT reported that, during 14-19 June, satellite images over Zhupanovsky detected gas-and-steam plumes with discrete ash plumes up to 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. drifting up to 70 km SE and NW from the volcano. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly on 14-15 and 17-19 June. The Aviation Color Code was raised from Yellow to Orange.

Tokyo VAAC reported ash plumes during 18-20 June drifting NW and later NE. Plume heights were in range of 3,000-8,500 m (9,800-28,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT); Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 June-17 June 2014

KVERT reported that satellite images over Zhupanovsky detected gas-and-steam plumes drifting 100 km E on 9 and 11 June. Snow in the region was covered by ash. The Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 June-10 June 2014

KVERT reported that an eruption at Zhupanovsky began on 6 June, producing an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,900 ft) a.s.l., as suggested by Tokyo VAAC and UHPP notices. Cloud cover prevented views from satellite. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Yellow. Satellite images on 9 June showed ash plumes rising to altitudes of 3-4 km (9,800-13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifting 60 km E.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 October-29 October 2013

KVERT reported that a weak thermal anomaly over Zhupanovsky was detected on 23 October. The next day a phreatic eruption began at about 0300 and generated an ash plume that rose 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. The ash plume was visible in satellite images drifting 40 km SE and S. Ash deposits about 10 cm thick were visible at the summit of the central part of the volcano, and deposits about 1 mm thick covered the Nalychevo Valley. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Orange. Ash plumes at 1635 and 2218 rose to altitudes of 2.5-3 km (8,200-10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 120 km ESE and 25 km S, respectively. At 1134 on 25 October an ash plume rose 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 20 km NE. On 27 October KVERT noted that strong fumarolic activity and gas emissions continued, but that the phreatic explosions likely had ceased. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Yellow, and then lowered again to Green on 29 October.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


Index of Bulletin Reports


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

03/1990 (BGVN 15:03) Four vigorous fumaroles

08/1993 (BGVN 18:08) Fumarolic emissions from active crater




Bulletin Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.


03/1990 (BGVN 15:03) Four vigorous fumaroles

On 2 February, fumarolic activity was noted in two vents inside the active crater and two vents to the W (figure 1).

Figure 1. Active fumarolic vents at Zhupanovsky, looking roughly E on 2 February 1990. Courtesy of B. Ivanov.

Information Contacts: B. Ivanov, IV.
Download or Cite this Report

08/1993 (BGVN 18:08) Fumarolic emissions from active crater

An overflight by members of SVE on 24 August 1993 revealed that significant fumarolic activity was present in the summit area. Fumarolic emissions were coming from the active crater, as well as from other parts of the summit ridge W of the second cone's crater. Yellow sulfur deposits were visible at several locations.

Information Contacts: H. Gaudru, SVE, Switzerland.
Download or Cite this Report

The Zhupanovsky volcanic massif consists of four overlapping stratovolcanoes along a WNW-trending ridge. The elongated volcanic complex was constructed within a Pliocene-early Pleistocene caldera whose rim is exposed only on the eastern side. Three of the stratovolcanoes were built during the Pleistocene, the fourth is Holocene in age and was the source of all of Zhupanovsky's historical eruptions. An early Holocene stage of frequent moderate and weak eruptions from 7000 to 5000 years before present (BP) was succeeded by a period of infrequent larger eruptions that produced pyroclastic flows. The last major eruption took place about 800-900 years BP. Historical eruptions have consisted of relatively minor explosions from the third cone.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2014 Jun 6 2014 Dec 1 (continuing) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
2013 Oct 23 2013 Oct 26 ± 1 days Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1959 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1956 Dec 27 1957 Jun Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Middle crater, east crater
1940 Jan 1940 Feb Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1929 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1925 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1882 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1776 Oct Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1000 ± 500 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
0050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
0220 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
3050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
5050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Zhupanovskaia, Sopka | Vahilskaia, Sopka | Vakhilskaya | Shupanowskij | Choupanov | Vakhul'skaya Sopka
During an eruption in January 1991, a lava dome filled the summit crater of Avachinsky and produced these dark lava flows that spilled over the south rim and traveled 1.5 km down the SSE flank. The modern cone of Avachinsky was constructed within a large horseshoe-shaped caldera, whose rims form the prominent ridge at the right and the more subdued ridge at the left. The breached caldera was formed by collapse of the volcano during the Pleistocene. The complex Zhupanovsky stratovolcano forms the center horizon to the NE.

Photo by Oleg Volynets, 1991 (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
Vigorous steam plumes rise from fumaroles on the summit ridge of Zhupanovsky volcano in February 1990. This view from the west shows plumes rising from the flanks of the historically active crater (bottom) and from the ridge above it, which forms the 2nd of Zhupanovsky's four stratovolcanoes. The peak at the top of the photo is the 2958-m-high summit of Zhupanovsky.

Photo by B.V. Ivanov, 1990 (Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry, Petropavlovsk).
All four stratovolcanoes forming the WNW-trending Zhupanovsky volcanic massif are seen in this view from the west. The upper peak marks the 2958-m-high summit of the complex, and the ridge below and to the right is the second stratovolcano. Steam rises from the historically active crater at the left center, which caps the third stratovolcano, the only one that was constructed during the Holocene. Historical eruptions have consisted of relatively minor explosions from this crater. The fourth cone (lower left) is the westernmost and lowest.

Photo by Oleg Volynets (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
A 200-250 m wide crater occupied the summit of Karymsky volcano following a long-term eruption during 1970-82. This early 1990's photo looks into the crater from the NE. Several other prominent central Kamchatka volcanoes form the snow-capped alignment of volcanoes in the background. Zhupanovsky volcano, at the extreme left, is composed of four overlapping stratovolcanoes constructed along an WNW-ESE line. Sharp-peaked Koryaksky volcano is at the left center, and the broad Dzensursky massif to its right.

Photo by Dan Miller (U.S. Geological Survey).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Fedotov S A, Masurenkov Y P (eds), 1991. Active Volcanoes of Kamchatka. Moscow: Nauka Pub, 2 volumes.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Kozhemyaka N N, 1995. Active volcanoes of Kamchatka: types and growth time of cones, total volumes of erupted material, productivity, and composition of rocks. Volc Seism, 16: 581-594 (English translation).

Luchitsky I V (ed), 1974. History of the Development of Relief of Siberia and the Far East. Kamchatka, Kurile and Komander Islands. Moscow: Nauka Pub, 439 p (in Russian).

Vlasov G M, 1967. Kamchatka, Kuril, and Komandorskiye Islands: geological description. In: {Geol of the USSR}, Moscow, 31: 1-827.

Vlodavetz V I, Piip B I, 1959. Kamchatka and Continental Areas of Asia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 8: 1-110.

Volcano Types

Compound
Caldera
Lava dome(s)
Pyroclastic cone(s)

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Dacite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
0
0
153
267,080

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Zhupanovsky Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.