Davidof

Photo of this volcano
  • United States
  • Alaska
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown - Evidence Uncertain
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 51.97°N
  • 178.33°E

  • 328 m
    1076 ft

  • 311040
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Davidof.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Davidof.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Davidof.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Davidof. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Davidof page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Photo Gallery


The view WNW from the western side of Little Sitkin Island includes the broad snow-free island of Davidof, part of the rim of a largely submerged caldera, across the right center. The snow-capped peak behind Davidof is historically active Segula volcano. In the background at far left is the snow-capped Kiska volcano.

Photo by Steve Ebbert, 2000 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).
See title for photo information.
Davidof Island rises across a strait from the western side of Little Sitkin Island. Five small islands, the largest of which is Davidof, are remnants of a stratovolcano that collapsed during the late Tertiary, forming a 2.7-km-wide caldera. The islands include Khvostof (upper right horizon), Pyramid, Lopy, and Davidof. The latter three islands form the eastern rim of the largely flooded caldera. The islands are vegetated, but lava flows are recognizable, and Holocene activity may have occurred.

Photo by Steve Ebbert, 2000 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Davidof in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites