Lanzarote

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 29.03°N
  • 13.63°W

  • 670 m
    2198 ft

  • 383060
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Lanzarote.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Lanzarote.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Lanzarote.

Basic Data

Volcano Number

Last Known Eruption

Elevation

Latitude
Longitude
383060

1824 CE

670 m / 2198 ft

29.03°N
13.63°W

Volcano Types

Fissure vent(s)
Pyroclastic cone(s)

Rock Types

Major
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Trachybasalt / Tephrite Basanite
Trachyandesite / Basaltic trachy-andesite
Minor
Trachyte / Trachyandesite

Tectonic Setting

Intraplate
Intermediate crust (15-25 km)

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
19,033
80,515
164,123
225,373

Geological Summary

The 60-km-long island of Lanzarote at the NE end of the Canary Islands contains the largest concentration of youthful volcanism in the Canaries. Pleistocene-and-Holocene cinder cones and lava flows erupted along NE-SW-trending fissures are found throughout the low-altitude arid island and on smaller islands to the north. The largest historical eruption of the Canary Islands took place during 1730-36, when long-term eruptions from a NE-SW-trending fissure formed the Montañas del Fuego and produced voluminous lava flows that covered about 200 sq km. The lava flows reached the western coast along a broad, 20-km-wide front. The villages of Maretas and Santa Catalina were destroyed, along with the most fertile valleys and estates of the arid island. An eruption during 1824 produced a much smaller lava flow that reached the SW coast.

References

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography.

Arana V, Carracedo J C, 1979. Los Volcanes de las Islas Canarias. II. Lanzarote-Fuerteventura. Madrid: Rueda, 176 p.

Carracedo J C, 1994. The Canary Islands: an example of structural control on the growth of large oceanic-island volcanoes. J Volc Geotherm Res, 60: 225-241.

Carracedo J C, Badiola E R, 1991. Lanzarote, la Erupcion Volcanica de 1730. Lanzarote: Servicio de Publicaciones, 184 p.

Carracedo J C, Badiola E R, Soler V, 1992. The 1730-1736 eruption of Lanzarote, Canary Islands: a long, high-magnitude basaltic fissure eruption. J Volc Geotherm Res, 53: 239-250.

Fuster J M, Fernandez Santin S, Sagredo J, 1968. Geologia y Volcanologia de las Islas Canarias - Lanzarote. Madrid: Inst "Lucas Mallada", 177 p.

Neumann van Padang M, Richards A F, Machado F, Bravo T, Baker P E, Le Maitre R W, 1967. Atlantic Ocean. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 21: 1-128.

Ortiz R, Arana V, Valberde C, 1986. Aproximacion al conocimiento del mecanismo de la erupcion de 1730-1736 en Lanzarote. Sociedad Espanola Fisica, Anales Fisica, Ser B, 82: 127-142.

Romero C, 1991. Las Manifestaciones Volcanicas Historicas del Archipielago Canario. Tenerife: Gobierno de Canarias, 2 vol, 695 & 768 p.

Schmincke H-U, Sumita M, 2010. Geological evolution of the Canary Islands. Koblenz: Gorres-Verlag: 188 p.

Solana M C, Kilburn C R J, Rodriguez Badiola E, Aparicio A, 2004. Fast emplacement of extensive pahoehoe flow-fields: the case of the 1736 flows from Montana de las Nueces, Lanzarote. J Volc Geotherm Res, 132: 189-207.

Eruptive History


Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1824 Jul 31 1824 Oct 24 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Tao, Nuevo del Fuego, Tinguatón
1730 Sep 1 1736 Apr 16 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Montañas del Fuego
0700 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Magnetism Mazo, Santa Catalina, Corazoncillo
0500 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Magnetism Montaña de Juan Perdomo

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Timanfaya, Montanas del

Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Amarilla, Montaña Cone 172 m 29° 13' 0" N 13° 32' 0" W
Bermeja, Montaña Cone 157 m 29° 17' 0" N 13° 31' 0" W
Blanca, Montaña Cone 556 m 28° 59' 0" N 13° 38' 0" W
Clara, Montaña Cone 256 m 29° 17' 0" N 13° 32' 0" W
Corona, Monte Cone - Crater 609 m 29° 11' 0" N 13° 29' 0" W
Fuego, Montañas del Cone - Crater 510 m 28° 59' 31" N 13° 44' 31" W
Guatisea, Montaña Cone 544 m 28° 56' 0" N 13° 38' 0" W
Helechos, Los Cone 581 m 29° 10' 0" N 13° 30' 0" W
Juan Perdomo, Montaña de Cone 129 m 28° 59' 0" N 13° 49' 0" W
Lobos, Montaña Cone - Crater 221 m 29° 23' 0" N 13° 30' 0" W
Mojon, Montaña del Cone 188 m 29° 14' 0" N 13° 30' 0" W
Morro de las Atalayas Cone 199 m 29° 24' 0" N 13° 30' 0" W
Partido, Pico Cone - Crater 517 m 29° 0' 7" N 13° 42' 7" W
Pedre Barba, Montaña de Cone 266 m 29° 15' 0" N 13° 30' 0" W
Roque de Infierno Cone 41 m 29° 19' 0" N 13° 31' 0" W
Tamia, Montaña Cone 550 m 29° 2' 0" N 13° 38' 0" W
Tao, Volcán de
    Clerigo Duarte, Montaña del
Cone - Crater 303 m 29° 2' 28" N 13° 37' 0" W
Timanfaya Antigua Cone 28° 59' 0" N 13° 41' 0" W
Tinga, Montaña de Cone 402 m 29° 0' 0" N 13° 40' 52" W

Craters

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Blanca, Caldera Crater - Cone 458 m 29° 2' 0" N 13° 44' 0" W
Caldera, La Crater - Cone 289 m 29° 24' 0" N 13° 32' 0" W
Colorada, Caldera
    Carcabullo o Pedregal
Caldera 465 m 29° 0' 0" N 13° 40' 34" W
Corazoncillo, Caldera del
    Fuencaliente, Caldera de
Crater - Cone 424 m 28° 59' 31" N 13° 43' 41" W
Fuego de Timanfaya, Montañas del [Quemada Crater - Cone 510 m 28° 59' 17" N 13° 56' 20" W
Lapas, Caldera de las
    Cuervo, the
    Cuervos, Caldera de los
    Cuervos, Montaña de los
Caldera 384 m 28° 59' 6" N 13° 41' 31" W
Nuevo del Fuego, Volcán
    Negra, Montaña
Caldera 356 m 29° 0' 14" N 13° 40' 34" W
Quemada de Orzola, La Crater
Quemadas, Las Calderas
    Occidentales, Calderas
Crater - Cone 384 m 28° 59' 17" N 13° 56' 20" W
Quemado, Volcán de el Crater 75 m 29° 59' 0" N 13° 49' 0" W
Rajada, Caldera
    Rajada, Montaña
    Quemada, Montaña
Caldera 225 m 28° 59' 17" N 13° 46' 59" W
Rodeos, Montana
    Colorada, Montaña
Caldera 458 m 28° 59' 31" N 13° 43' 0" W
Roja de Mazo, Caldera
    Mazo, Volcán de
Caldera 427 m 29° 0' 47" N 13° 44' 10" W
Santa Catalina, Caldera de Crater 29° 59' 0" N 13° 42' 0" W
Tinguaton
    Nuevo, Volcán
Crater - Cone 330 m 29° 0' 47" N 13° 42' 32" W

Photo Gallery


Circular Caldera del Corazoncillo (center), also known as Caldera de Fuencaliente, was active during a two-week period in September 1730, at the beginning of the 1730-36 Montañas del Fuego eruption on Lanzarote. The lava flows were erupted from NE-SW-trending fissures, and most reached the coast along a broad 20-km-wide front on the western side of the island. The 60-km-long island of Lanzarote at the NE end of the Canary Islands contains the largest concentration of youthful volcanism in the Canaries.

Photo by Nicolau Wallenstein (Center of Volcanology, Azores University).
The Caldera de los Cuervos (left-center) was formed during the initial stage of the largest historical eruption of the Canary Islands during 1730 to 1736. Eruptions from a NE-SW trending fissure formed the Montañas del Fuego and produced voluminous lava flows that covered about 200 sq km, reaching the western coast. The villages of Maretas and Santa Catalina were destroyed along with the most fertile valleys and estates of the arid island.

Photo by Raphaël Paris, 2001 (CNRS, Clermont-Ferrand).

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


A listing of samples from the Smithsonian collections will be available soon.

Affiliated Sites

Large Eruptions of Lanzarote Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
MODVOLC - HIGP MODIS Thermal Alert System Using infrared satellite Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, scientists at the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawai'i, developed an automated system called MODVOLC to map thermal hot-spots in near real time. For each MODIS image, the algorithm automatically scans each 1 km pixel within it to check for high-temperature hot-spots. When one is found the date, time, location, and intensity are recorded. MODIS looks at every square km of the Earth every 48 hours, once during the day and once during the night, and the presence of two MODIS sensors in space allows at least four hot-spot observations every two days. Each day updated global maps are compiled to display the locations of all hot spots detected in the previous 24 hours. There is a drop-down list with volcano names which allow users to 'zoom-in' and examine the distribution of hot-spots at a variety of spatial scales.
MIROVA Middle InfraRed Observation of Volcanic Activity (MIROVA) is a near real time volcanic hot-spot detection system based on the analysis of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. In particular, MIROVA uses the Middle InfraRed Radiation (MIR), measured over target volcanoes, in order to detect, locate and measure the heat radiation sourced from volcanic activity.