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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-04567

Stratovolcanoes are composed of accumulated layers of lava flows from effusive eruptions and fragmented rock from explosive eruptions. Glacier-clad Mount Rainier, seen here from the NW, is located in the northern Cascade Range. Most eruptions originate from a central conduit, which produces the common conical profile of stratovolcanoes, but flank eruptions also occur. Both isolated stratovolcanoes like Mount Rainier and compound volcanoes formed by overlapping cones are common. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1983 (Smithsonian Institution).

Stratovolcanoes are composed of accumulated layers of lava flows from effusive eruptions and fragmented rock from explosive eruptions. Glacier-clad Mount Rainier, seen here from the NW, is located in the northern Cascade Range. Most eruptions originate from a central conduit, which produces the common conical profile of stratovolcanoes, but flank eruptions also occur. Both isolated stratovolcanoes like Mount Rainier and compound volcanoes formed by overlapping cones are common.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1983 (Smithsonian Institution).

Creative Commons Icon This image is made available under the Public Domain Dedication CC0 license, but proper attribution is appreciated.

Keywords: stratovolcano


Rainier