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Current Eruptions

Overall, 48 volcanoes were in continuing eruption status as of 19 April 2024. An eruption marked as "continuing" does not always mean persistent daily activity, but indicates at least intermittent eruptive events without a break of 3 months or more. There are typically 40-50 continuing eruptions, and out of those generally around 20 will be actively erupting on any particular day (though we do not keep detailed statistics on daily activity). Additional annual eruption data is available for recent years.

The Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report (WVAR) for the week ending on 14 May 2024 includes the 19 volcanoes shown below marked "Yes" in the WVAR column (rollover for report). The most recently started eruption is at the top, continuing as of the Last Known Activity date. An eruption listed here might have ended since the last data update, or at the update time a firm end date had not yet been determined due to potential renewed activity. Complete updates are done about every 6-8 weeks, but information about newer eruptions can be found in the Weekly Report.

Volcano Country Eruption Start Date Last Known Activity Max VEI WVAR
Ruang Indonesia 2024 Apr 16 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) Yes
Taal Philippines 2024 Apr 12 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) Yes
Barren Island India 2024 Mar 15 2024 Apr 19 (continuing)
Fernandina Ecuador 2024 Mar 2 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 1 Yes
Lewotobi Indonesia 2023 Dec 23 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) Yes
Reykjanes Iceland 2023 Dec 18 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 0 Yes
Marapi Indonesia 2023 Dec 3 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) Yes
Poas Costa Rica 2023 Dec 1 2024 Apr 19 (continuing)
Ioto Japan 2023 Oct 18 2024 Mar 31 (continuing)
Mayon Philippines 2023 Apr 27 ± 2 days 2024 Apr 19 (continuing)
Kikai Japan 2023 Mar 27 2024 Apr 10 (continuing)
Etna Italy 2022 Nov 27 2024 Apr 10 (continuing) 1
Ebeko Russia 2022 Jun 11 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2 Yes
Kavachi Solomon Islands 2021 Oct 2 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 0
Rincon de la Vieja Costa Rica 2021 Jun 28 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Great Sitkin United States 2021 May 25 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2 Yes
Merapi Indonesia 2020 Dec 31 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 1 Yes
Lewotolok Indonesia 2020 Nov 27 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Sangay Ecuador 2019 Mar 26 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Tinakula Solomon Islands 2018 Dec 8 (in or before) 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Karangetang Indonesia 2018 Nov 25 2024 Apr 12 (continuing) 2
Nyamulagira DR Congo 2018 Apr 18 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 0
Semeru Indonesia 2017 Jun 6 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 4 Yes
Ol Doinyo Lengai Tanzania 2017 Apr 9 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 0
Aira Japan 2017 Mar 25 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2 Yes
Bezymianny Russia 2016 Dec 5 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 3
Sabancaya Peru 2016 Nov 6 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 3
Langila Papua New Guinea 2015 Oct 22 (?) 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Masaya Nicaragua 2015 Oct 3 2024 Apr 12 (continuing) 1
Tofua Tonga 2015 Oct 2 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 0 Yes
Villarrica Chile 2014 Dec 2 ± 7 days 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 3
Nevado del Ruiz Colombia 2014 Nov 18 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Saunders United Kingdom 2014 Nov 12 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 1
Manam Papua New Guinea 2014 Jun 29 2024 Mar 9 (continuing) 4 Yes
Heard Australia 2012 Sep 5 ± 4 days 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 0
Reventador Ecuador 2008 Jul 27 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Ibu Indonesia 2008 Apr 5 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 1 Yes
Popocatepetl Mexico 2005 Jan 9 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Suwanosejima Japan 2004 Oct 23 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2 Yes
Fuego Guatemala 2002 Jan 4 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 3
Bagana Papua New Guinea 2000 Feb 28 (in or before) 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Sheveluch Russia 1999 Aug 15 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 4 Yes
Erebus Antarctica 1972 Dec 16 (in or before) ± 15 days 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Erta Ale Ethiopia 1967 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 0
Stromboli Italy 1934 Feb 2 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 2
Dukono Indonesia 1933 Aug 13 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 3 Yes
Santa Maria Guatemala 1922 Jun 22 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 3
Yasur Vanuatu 1270 ± 110 years 2024 Apr 19 (continuing) 3
Report for Tofua
Tonga Geological Services reported that unrest at Tofua continued during 8-14 May. Thermal anomalies were detected daily and had intensities that fluctuated at low levels. The Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow (the second lowest color on a four-color scale); the Maritime Alert Level remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale) and mariners were advised to stay 2 km away from the island; the Alert level for residents of Vava’u and Ha’apai remained at Green (the lowest color on a four-color scale).
Report for Manam
The Darwin VAAC reported that on 12 May an ash plume from Manam rose to 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E based on satellite images and weather models. The plume had dissipated by 0030 on 13 May.
Report for Marapi
PVMBG reported that unrest at Marapi (on Sumatra) was ongoing during 8-14 May. White gas-and-steam plumes rose 200-300 m above the summit and drifted in multiple directions on most days; no emissions were visible on 10 May. An eruptive event was recorded on 10 May, though plumes were not visible.

Lahars generated by intense rainfall occurred around 2100 on 11 May and caused several fatalities, evacuations, and widespread damage in the Agam Regency. The lahars originated in the Malana or Lona drainage on Marapi’s flank and significantly impacted several areas including in the Agam, Tanah Datar, Padang Panjang, and Padang Pariaman districts. Aid efforts were delayed by damage to bridges and several sections of roads between villages. Close to 200 homes were damaged or missing, around 72 hectares of fields were affected, and mosques were damaged. Search-and-rescue efforts were suspended overnight during 11-12 May due to lack of light and continuing flooding in upstream areas. As of 1300 on 13 May there were 15 people that remained missing. The number of evacuees totaled 1,159 in the Agam Regency and 2,039 in the Tanah Datar Regency. Accordion to a news report the death toll reached 43 people on 15 May. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to stay 4.5 km away from the active crater.
Report for Merapi
BPPTKG reported that the eruption at Merapi (on Java) continued during 3-9 May. Seismicity had intensified compared to the previous week. The SW lava dome produced 176 lava avalanches that traveled as far as 2 km down the Bebeng drainage on the SW flank. Morphological changes to the SW lava dome were due to continuing effusion and collapses of material. The volume of the SW dome was an estimated 2,299,600 cubic meters and the dome in the main crater was stable at an estimated 2,360,000 cubic meters based on a 9 May drone survey and webcam images. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to stay 3-7 km away from the summit, based on location.
Report for Semeru
PVMBG reported that eruptive activity continued at Semeru during 8-14 May. White-and-gray ash plumes rose 300-800 m above the summit and drifted in multiple directions during 8-9 and 12-14 May. Several additional eruptive events were recorded during the week by the seismic network, though plumes were not visually confirmed. The Alert Level remained at 3 (the third highest level on a scale of 1-4). The public was warned to stay at least 5 km away from the summit in all directions, 13 km from the summit to the SE, 500 m from the banks of the Kobokan drainage as far as 17 km from the summit, and to avoid other drainages including the Bang, Kembar, and Sat, due to lahar, avalanche, and pyroclastic flow hazards.
Report for Lewotobi
PVMBG reported that an eruption at Lewotobi’s Laki-laki volcano continued during 8-14 May. White steam-and-gas plumes rose 50-150 m above the summit and drifted in multiple directions during 8-9 and 12 May; eruptive events were occasionally recorded during those days though emission details were unknown. Gray-to-white ash plumes rose 50-200 m above the summit and drifted SW and W during 10-11 and 13-14 May. The Alert Level remained at 2 (the second lowest level on a scale of 1-4) and the public was warned to stay outside of the exclusion zone, defined as a 2-km radius around Laki-laki crater, 3 km to the NNE, and 5 km on the NE flanks.
Report for Ruang
PVMBG reported that during 1-12 May seismicity at Ruang was characterized by decreasing numbers of volcanic earthquakes and continuous tremor with decreasing amplitudes. During 8-13 May white plumes rose 200-400 m above the summit and drifted in multiple directions. The Alert Level was lowered to 3 (the second highest level on a scale of 1-4) and the public was warned to stay 4 km away from the active crater.
Report for Dukono
PVMBG reported that the eruption at Dukono was ongoing during 8-14 May. Gray-and-white ash plumes rose 450-1,200 m above the summit and drifted E and SE almost daily; emissions were not observed on 14 May. The Alert Level remained at Level 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 3-km exclusion zone.
Report for Ibu
PVMBG reported that the eruption at Ibu was intensifying. At 0158 on 8 May a dense gray ash plume rose 2 km above the summit, produced lightning in the plume, and drifted E and SE. Incandescence from the crater was visible and roaring could be heard in areas as far away as the Ibu observation post (9 km W). Seismicity was at high levels. The Alert Level was raised to 3 (the second highest level on a four-level scale) and the public was advised to stay 3 km away from the active crater and 5 km away from the N crater wall opening. Additional ash plumes that same day were gray-to-white or gray-to-black, rose 1.5-2 km, and drifted NE, E, and SE. Dense gray ash plumes rose 1.2-1.5 km and drifted E on 9 May. At 0024 on 11 May a dense gray ash plume rose 4 km and drifted N and NW and at 0912 a dense gray-to-black ash plume rose 5 km and drifted W.
Report for Taal
PHIVOLCS reported ongoing unrest at Taal during 8-14 May. Sulfur dioxide emissions decreased during the previous week, with emissions averaged 2,191 tonnes per day (t/d) on 6 May. Minor phreatic events were recorded during 0827-0831 on 8 May in seismic and infrasound data. The events produced white steam plumes that rose 2 km above Main Crater and drifted SW based on webcam images. Sulfur dioxide emissions increased slightly on 9 May to 2,346 (t/d). A series of phreatic events were visible in webcam images during 0703-0709, 0717-0718, 0752-0754, 0757-0800, and a fifth that ended at 1029 on 10 May. Steam plumes rose 100-300 m and drifted SW. The Alert Level remained at 1 (on a scale of 0-5), and PHIVOLCS reminded the public that the entire Taal Volcano Island was a Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) and to take extra precautions around Main Crater, when boating on Taal Lake, and along the Daang Kastila fissure.
Report for Suwanosejima
JMA reported that eruptive activity at Suwanosejima's Ontake Crater continued during 6-13 May. Crater incandescence was observed nightly in webcam images. An explosion was recorded at 2145 on 8 May though details of plumes were unknown. An explosion at 0831 on 9 May produced an ash plume that rose 400 m above the crater rim and drifted S. Eruptive events at 2339 on 9 May and at 0213 on 10 May generated ash plumes that rose 1.1-1.3 km above the crater rim and drifted SW. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a 5-level scale) and the public was warned to stay at least 1.5 km away from the crater.
Report for Aira
JMA reported ongoing eruptive activity at Minamidake Crater (Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano) during 6-13 May with nighttime crater incandescence. Very small eruptive events were recorded. Sulfur dioxide emissions were high, averaging 2,000 tons per day on 7 May. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale), and the public was warned to stay 1 km away from both craters.
Report for Ebeko
KVERT reported that moderate explosive activity was ongoing at Ebeko during 3-10 May According to volcanologists in Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island, about 7 km E), explosions on 2 and 6 May generated ash plumes that rose as high as 2.5 km (8,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE and S. A thermal anomaly was identified in satellite images on 3 and 6 May; on other days either no activity was observed or weather conditions prevented views. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the third level on a four-color scale). Dates are UTC; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Sheveluch
KVERT reported that the new lava dome at Sheveluch, named Karan-1, continued to grow during 3-9 May. Strong steam-and-gas emissions rose from the active area and incandescence at the dome was visible at night. A daily intense and large thermal anomaly over the dome was identified in satellite images. Kamchatka Volcanological Station volcanologists conducted field work on 8 May, including photos and drone observations of the new dome. At that time the dome was at least 70 m high, actively growing and, spalling rock avalanches down the flanks. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the third level on a four-color scale). Dates are based on UTC times; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Great Sitkin
AVO reported that slow lava effusion in Great Sitkin’s summit crater likely continued during 8-14 May. Seismicity was low. Weather clouds fully or partly obscured satellite and webcam views. The active portion of the lava flow was warm and snow-free in partly-cloudy webcam views during 13-14 May.The Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch (the third level on a four-level scale) and the Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the third color on a four-color scale).
Report for Purace
Observatorio Vulcanológico y Sismológico de Popayán, Servicio Geologico Colombiano (SGC) reported that the number of both volcanic tremor (VT) and long-period (LP) seismic events at Puracé were stable during 7-13 May with only a slight increase in both the number and intensity of LP events on 9 May. The VT events had low magnitudes and were located at depths up to 4 km beneath the volcano and its E flank. The largest VT events were a M 1.8 recorded at 2351 on 7 May and at 2202 on 10 May. LP earthquakes were located in similar areas as the VT events, at depths less than 2 km. Earthquakes indicating magma movement were recorded during 7-9 May. Inclement weather sometimes prevented visual observations of emissions, though during the second part of the week diffuse fumarolic emissions from the crater and the crater rim were visible. Both carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide emissions remained above baseline levels. The Alert Level remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Fernandina
Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG-EPN) reported that the eruption at Fernandina decreased during 8-14 May. Sulfur dioxide emissions, measured using satellite data, ceased to be detected on 8 May, possibly indicating a decline in activity. Daily thermal anomalies from the lava flow were identified in satellite images.
Report for Ubinas
Instituto Geofísico del Perú (IGP) reported that thermal anomalies from the main crater floor at Ubinas were identified almost daily during 7-14 May. Ash, gas, and steam plumes rose to 1.1 km above the crater rim during 7-8 May. Similar plumes emitted continuously for a period of time on 12 May rose to 1.1 km above the crater rim and drifted S and SE. The Alert Level remained at Yellow (the second level on a four-color scale) and the public was warned to stay 2 km away from the crater.
Report for Reykjanes
IMO reported that no active lava in the cone just E of Sundhnúk and along the fissure within the Reykanes volcanic system was visible in aerial photos taken during the evening of 8 May, indicating that the eruption was over. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale) because magma continued to accumulate at depth at a consistent rate, increasing the likelihood of a new eruption. Seismicity was relatively stable with 50-80 earthquakes recorded each day during the previous week. Most of the earthquakes were below M 1, though a few earthquakes had magnitudes close to 2.