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Current Eruptions

Although detailed statistics are not kept on daily activity, generally there are around 20 volcanoes actively erupting at any particular time. The Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report (WVAR) for the week ending on 16 July 2019 includes the 23 volcanoes bolded and shown below in the WVAR column (rollover for report).

Overall there are 49 volcanoes with ongoing eruptions as of the Stop Dates indicated, and as reported through the last data update (11 July 2019), sorted with the most recently started eruption at the top. Information about more recently started eruptions can be found in the Weekly Report linked above.

An eruption marked as "continuing" does not always mean that the activity is continuous or happening today, but that there have been at least some intermittent eruptive events at that volcano without a break of at least 3 months since it started. An eruption listed here also might have ended since the last public data update, or at the update time a firm end date had not yet been determined due to potential renewed activity.

Volcano Country Eruption Start Date Eruption Stop Date Max VEI WVAR
Ubinas Peru 2019 Jun 24 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) Yes
Colima Mexico 2019 May 11 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) Yes
Sinabung Indonesia 2019 May 7 2019 Jun 9 (continuing)
Asosan Japan 2019 Apr 16 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) Yes
Klyuchevskoy Russia 2019 Apr 9 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) Yes
Sangay Ecuador 2019 Mar 26 2019 Jul 11 (continuing)
Karymsky Russia 2019 Feb 16 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) Yes
Poas Costa Rica 2019 Feb 7 2019 Jul 11 (continuing)
Tinakula Solomon Islands 2018 Dec 8 (in or before) 2019 Jul 3 (continuing) 2
Karangetang Indonesia 2018 Nov 25 2019 Jun 29 (continuing) 2
Barren Island India 2018 Sep 25 2019 Jul 9 (continuing) 1
Rincon de la Vieja Costa Rica 2018 Jul 28 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 1
Krakatau Indonesia 2018 Jun 18 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 3 Yes
Merapi Indonesia 2018 May 11 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 3 Yes
Kerinci Indonesia 2018 Apr 21 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 1 Yes
Mayon Philippines 2018 Jan 13 2019 Jun 24 (continuing) 2
Kadovar Papua New Guinea 2018 Jan 5 2019 May 17 (continuing) 2
Agung Indonesia 2017 Nov 21 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 3
Ambae Vanuatu 2017 Sep 6 (?) 2019 Jul 8 (continuing) 3
Sangeang Api Indonesia 2017 Jul 15 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2 Yes
Ol Doinyo Lengai Tanzania 2017 Apr 9 2019 Jun 18 (continuing) 0
Aira Japan 2017 Mar 25 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 1 Yes
Sabancaya Peru 2016 Nov 6 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 3
Ebeko Russia 2016 Oct 20 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2 Yes
Saunders United Kingdom 2016 Sep 28 2019 May 9 (continuing) 1
Nevados de Chillan Chile 2016 Jan 8 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2 Yes
Masaya Nicaragua 2015 Oct 3 2019 Jul 6 (continuing) 1
Pacaya Guatemala 2015 Jun 7 ± 1 days 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 1
Turrialba Costa Rica 2015 Mar 8 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2
Villarrica Chile 2014 Dec 2 ± 7 days 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 1 Yes
Manam Papua New Guinea 2014 Jun 29 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2 Yes
Semeru Indonesia 2014 Apr 1 ± 15 days 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 3 Yes
Etna Italy 2013 Sep 3 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2
Heard Australia 2012 Sep 5 ± 4 days 2019 Jun 10 (continuing) 0
Bezymianny Russia 2010 May 21 (?) 2019 Jul 7 (continuing) 3
Reventador Ecuador 2008 Jul 27 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2 Yes
Ibu Indonesia 2008 Apr 5 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 1 Yes
Popocatepetl Mexico 2005 Jan 9 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2 Yes
Suwanosejima Japan 2004 Oct 23 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2
Nyiragongo DR Congo 2002 May 17 (?) 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2
Fuego Guatemala 2002 Jan 4 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 3
Bagana Papua New Guinea 2000 Feb 28 (in or before) 2019 Jul 7 (continuing) 2
Sheveluch Russia 1999 Aug 15 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 4 Yes
Erebus Antarctica 1972 Dec 16 (in or before) ± 15 days 2019 Jul 8 (continuing) 2
Erta Ale Ethiopia 1967 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2019 Jul 7 (continuing) 0
Stromboli Italy 1934 Feb 2 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 2 Yes
Dukono Indonesia 1933 Aug 13 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 3 Yes
Santa Maria Guatemala 1922 Jun 22 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 3
Yasur Vanuatu 1774 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2019 Jul 11 (continuing) 3
Report for Stromboli
INGV reported that the paroxysmal explosive sequence at Stromboli on 3 July changed the morphology of the crater terrace. The rim of the terrace facing the Sciara del Fuoco was removed, and the N1 and N2 vents in Area N (north crater area, NCA) had enlarged and merged into one. After the paroxysmal event explosive activity rapidly decreased, though it remained more intense than normal. The vents of Area C-S (South Central crater area) produced explosions regularly during 8-14 July, and fed lava flows that traveled about halfway down the Sciara del Fuoco. Material from the lava-flow fronts rolled all the way to the coastline. A new lava flow from Area N (north crater area, NCA) began at 1900 on 14 July.
Report for Manam
The Darwin VAAC reported that on 12 July an ash plume from Manam rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N, based on satellite data and weather models.
Report for Kerinci
The Darwin VAAC reported that on 12 July an ash plume from Kerinci rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW, based on satellite images and weather models.
Report for Krakatau
PVMBG reported that Anak Krakatau’s seismic network recorded as many as 25 eruptive events during 1-7 July. The events were not followed by visible ash emissions, though observations were hindered by weather conditions. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 2-km radius hazard zone from the crater.
Report for Merapi
PVMBG reported that during 8-14 July the lava-dome volume at Merapi did not change and was an estimated 475,000 cubic meters, based on analyses of drone images. Extruded lava fell into the upper parts of the SE-flank, generating two block-and-ash flows that traveled 1 km down the Gendol drainage on 13 and 14 July. White plumes rose as high as 300 m above the summit. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and residents were warned to remain outside of the 3-km exclusion zone.
Report for Semeru
The Darwin VAAC reported that on 10 July an ash plume from Semeru rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted WNW based on satellite images and weather models. Ash plumes rose to 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. on 13 July and drifted NW and W.
Report for Sangeang Api
The Darwin VAAC reported that during 10-16 July ash plumes from Sangeang Api were visible in satellite images rising to 2.1-3 km (7,000-10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifting in multiple directions. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4).
Report for Dukono
Based on satellite and wind model data, and notices from PVMBG, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 11-16 July ash plumes from Dukono rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.1 km (6,000-7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N and NE. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 2-km exclusion zone.
Report for Ibu
The Darwin VAAC reported that on 15 July an ash plume from Ibu rose to 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE based on satellite images and weather models. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to stay at least 2 km away from the active crater, and 3.5 km away on the N side.
Report for Aira
JMA reported that during 8-16 July very small eruptive events were detected at Minamidake crater (at Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano), though none of them were explosive. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale).
Report for Asosan
JMA reported that sulfur dioxide emissions at Asosan’s Nakadake Crater reached a high value of 2,300 tons per day on 12 July. Very small events ejected sediment during 13-16 July. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-5).
Report for Ebeko
Volcanologists in Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island), about 7 km E of Ebeko, observed explosions during 5-12 July that sent ash plumes up to 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. The plumes drifted S. A thermal anomaly was visible in satellite images on 11 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Karymsky
KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Karymsky was identified in satellite images during 4-5 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Klyuchevskoy
KVERT reported that a weak thermal anomaly over Klyuchevskoy was visible in satellite images during 4-5 and 7 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Sheveluch
KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Sheveluch’s lava dome was identified daily in satellite images during 6-12 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Great Sitkin
On 15 July AVO reported that seismicity at Great Sitkin had decreased to background levels during the past few weeks with no evidence of eruptive activity in geophysical or satellite data. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Green and the Volcano Alert Level was lowered to Normal.
Report for Shishaldin
AVO increased the Aviation Color Code for Shishaldin to Yellow and the Volcano Alert Level to Advisory on 12 July following several weeks of increasing seismicity and elevated temperatures in the summit crater identified in satellite images. In addition incandescence in the crater was visible during an overflight. Seismic tremor continued to be elevated at least through 16 July.
Report for Colima
Centro Universitario de Estudios e Investigaciones de Vulcanologia - Universidad de Colima reported that intermittent steam-and-gas emissions, mainly from the NE side of the crater, and two small explosions were recorded during 5-12 July. Five lahars descended the Montegrande ravine. An overflight on 9 July revealed that the diameter of the vent had slightly increased, likely caused by subsidence, and other areas of minor subsidence within the crater were noted. An area of collapsed material on the outer W wall was also identified. Temperatures inside the crater were 116 degrees Celsius, lower than the temperature of 250 degrees Celsius recorded in May. The temperatures in the fumarolic area decreased from 202 degrees Celsius in May to 169 degrees. A thermal camera located S of the volcano recorded thermal anomalies associated with fumarolic emissions. Weather conditions sometimes prevented observations of the crater.
Report for Popocatepetl
CENAPRED reported that each day during 9-15 July there were 49-326 steam-and-gas emissions from Popocatépetl, some of which contained minor amounts of ash. As many as three explosions per day were recorded, though weather conditions often prevented visual characterization of ash emissions. An explosion at 1949 on 11 July generated an ash plume that rose 2.8 km above the crater rim. The Alert Level remained at Yellow, Phase Two (middle level on a three-color scale).
Report for Reventador
IG reported that during 10-16 July seismic data from Reventador’s network indicated a high level of seismic activity, including explosions, long-period earthquakes, harmonic tremor, and signals indicating emissions. Weather often prevented views of the summit area, although during clear conditions ash plumes were visible rising at least 600 m above the crater rim and drifting W and N. Blocks were observed rolling 500-600 m down the flanks on 10 and 16 July.
Report for Ubinas
Instituto Geofísico del Perú (IGP) reported that seismic activity at Ubinas remained elevated during 1-15 July; volcano-tectonic events averaged 279 per day and long-period events (indicating fluid movement) averaged 116 events per day. Minor bluish emissions rose from the crater. The Alert Level remained at Yellow (on a 4-level scale).
Report for Nevados de Chillan
ONEMI and SERNAGEOMIN reported that an explosive event at Nevados de Chillán’s Nicanor Crater recorded at 0657 on 14 July was associated with a long-period earthquake signal. The explosion ejected incandescent material onto areas near the crater. The Alert Level remained at Orange, the second highest level on a four-color scale, and residents were reminded not to approach the crater within 3 km. ONEMI maintained an Alert Level Yellow (the middle level on a three-color scale) for the communities of Pinto, Coihueco, and San Fabián.
Report for Villarrica
POVI reported that webcam images captured deposits of incandescent material on the flank 300 m from Villarrica’s summit crater in the morning of 15 July. Incandescent material from lava fountaining ejected above the crater rim was periodically visible on 16 July.