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Current Eruptions

Overall, 46 volcanoes were in continuing eruption status as of 6 June 2024. An eruption marked as "continuing" does not always mean persistent daily activity, but indicates at least intermittent eruptive events without a break of 3 months or more. There are typically 40-50 continuing eruptions, and out of those generally around 20 will be actively erupting on any particular day (though we do not keep detailed statistics on daily activity). Additional annual eruption data is available for recent years.

The Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report (WVAR) for the week ending on 11 June 2024 includes the 20 volcanoes shown below marked "Yes" in the WVAR column (rollover for report). The most recently started eruption is at the top, continuing as of the Last Known Activity date. An eruption listed here might have ended since the last data update, or at the update time a firm end date had not yet been determined due to potential renewed activity. Complete updates are done about every 6-8 weeks, but information about newer eruptions can be found in the Weekly Report.

List of the 46 volcanoes with continuing eruptions as of 6 June 2024
Volcano Country Eruption Start Date Last Known Activity WVAR
Kanlaon Philippines 2024 Jun 3 2024 Jun 4 (continuing) Yes
Dempo Indonesia 2024 May 27 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Ubinas Peru 2024 May 6 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Ruang Indonesia 2024 Apr 16 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Taal Philippines 2024 Apr 12 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Barren Island India 2024 Mar 15 2024 May 29 (continuing)
Lewotobi Indonesia 2023 Dec 23 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Reykjanes Iceland 2023 Dec 18 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Marapi Indonesia 2023 Dec 3 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Poas Costa Rica 2023 Dec 1 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Mayon Philippines 2023 Apr 27 ± 2 days 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Ebeko Russia 2022 Jun 11 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Rincon de la Vieja Costa Rica 2021 Jun 28 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Great Sitkin United States 2021 May 25 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Merapi Indonesia 2020 Dec 31 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Lewotolok Indonesia 2020 Nov 27 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Sangay Ecuador 2019 Mar 26 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Tinakula Solomon Islands 2018 Dec 8 2024 Apr 25 (continuing)
Nyamulagira DR Congo 2018 Apr 18 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Semeru Indonesia 2017 Jun 6 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Ol Doinyo Lengai Tanzania 2017 Apr 9 2024 Jun 1 (continuing)
Aira Japan 2017 Mar 25 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Bezymianny Russia 2016 Dec 5 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Sabancaya Peru 2016 Nov 6 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Langila Papua New Guinea 2015 Oct 22 (?) 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Masaya Nicaragua 2015 Oct 3 2024 May 22 (continuing)
Tofua Tonga 2015 Oct 2 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Villarrica Chile 2014 Dec 2 ± 7 days 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Nevado del Ruiz Colombia 2014 Nov 18 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Saunders United Kingdom 2014 Nov 12 2024 Apr 20 (continuing)
Manam Papua New Guinea 2014 Jun 29 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Heard Australia 2012 Sep 5 ± 4 days 2024 May 27 (continuing)
Reventador Ecuador 2008 Jul 27 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Ibu Indonesia 2008 Apr 5 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Popocatepetl Mexico 2005 Jan 9 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Suwanosejima Japan 2004 Oct 23 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Nyiragongo DR Congo 2002 May 17 (?) 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Fuego Guatemala 2002 Jan 4 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Bagana Papua New Guinea 2000 Feb 28 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Sheveluch Russia 1999 Aug 15 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Erebus Antarctica 1972 Dec 16 ± 15 days 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Erta Ale Ethiopia 1967 Jul 2 ± 182 days 2024 Apr 19 (continuing)
Stromboli Italy 1934 Feb 2 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Dukono Indonesia 1933 Aug 13 2024 Jun 6 (continuing) Yes
Santa Maria Guatemala 1922 Jun 22 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Yasur Vanuatu 1270 ± 110 years 2024 Jun 6 (continuing)
Report for Nyiragongo
Thermal anomalies on Nyiragongo’s crater floor were identified in satellite images on 31 May and 5 June.
Report for Marapi
PVMBG reported that eruptive activity at Marapi (on Sumatra) was ongoing during 5-11 June. White gas-and-steam plumes rose 200-300 m above the summit and drifted in multiple directions during 5-6 and 8 June. White-and-gray ash plumes rose 300-750 m above the summit and drifted multiple directions during 7 and 9-10 June. One of the ash plumes, recorded at 0810 on 9 June, was gray-to-brown and rose 300 m and drifted SE. Emissions were not visible on 11 June. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to stay 4.5 km away from the active crater.
Report for Merapi
BPPTKG reported that the eruption at Merapi (on Java) continued during 31 May-6 June. Seismicity had decreased compared to the previous week. The SW lava dome produced 141 lava avalanches that traveled as far as 1.9 km down the upper part of the Bebeng drainage on the SW flank. Three pyroclastic flows also descended the Bebeng, traveling as far as 1 km. Morphological changes to the SW lava dome were due to continuing effusion and collapses of material. The volume of the SW dome was an estimated 2,335,200 cubic meters and the dome in the main crater was stable at an estimated 2,362,800 cubic meters based on a 6 June drone survey. The highest temperature of the SW dome was around 243 degrees Celsius, lower than the previous measurement. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to stay 3-7 km away from the summit, based on location.
Report for Semeru
PVMBG reported that eruptive activity continued at Semeru. Continuous tiltmeter and GPS data showed that inflation was detected in May and seismic data showed that magma continued to rise to the surface. During 5-11 June white-and-gray ash plumes that were sometimes dense rose 300-800 m above the summit and drifted S and SW on all days except for 7 June. Several additional daily eruptive events were recorded by the seismic network, though plumes were not visually confirmed. During 0000-0600 on 10 June there were 28 lava avalanches that descended the Kobokan drainage as far as 2.5 km. The Alert Level remained at 3 (the third highest level on a scale of 1-4). The public was warned to stay at least 5 km away from the summit in all directions, 13 km from the summit to the SE, 500 m from the banks of the Kobokan drainage as far as 17 km from the summit, and to avoid other drainages including the Bang, Kembar, and Sat, due to lahar, avalanche, and pyroclastic flow hazards.
Report for Lewotobi
PVMBG reported that eruptive activity at Lewotobi’s Laki-laki volcano increased during 26 May-9 June. Eruptive activity increased daily, and ash-and-steam plumes became taller, rising 100-900 m above the summit on average and drifting in multiple directions; dense ash emissions rose 1-1.1 km above them summit on 5 and 9 June. The number of volcanic earthquakes as well as earthquake signals indicating eruptive events and avalanches significantly increased. PVMBG noted that there was also a significant increase in other types of seismic signals, though those increases were unrelated to the eruption; repairs and changes to the seismic network resulted in better detection of seismic signals. Incandescence at the summit was visible in a 5 June webcam image, and Strombolian activity was periodically visible on 9 June. At 0900 on 10 June the Alert Level was raised to 3 (the second lowest level on a scale of 1-4) and the public was warned to stay outside of the exclusion zone, defined as a 3-km radius around Laki-laki crater, 4 km to the NNE, and 5 km on the NE flanks. Strombolian activity continued on 10 June and several ash emissions rose 600-1,000 m above the summit. Gray ash emissions rose 300-600 m above the summit and drifted SW and W on 11 June.

The lava flows on the NE flank advanced 20 m during 29 February-9 April to a total length of 4.34 km; the advancement was due to gravitational forces and not eruptive activity, and no additional advancement had been recorded since.
Report for Lewotolok
PVMBG reported that the eruption at Lewotolok continued during 5-11 June. Daily white steam-and-gas plumes rose as high as 600 m above the summit and drifted multiple directions. On 11 June white-and-gray ash plumes rose 100-400 m and drifted W and E. Summit incandescence and incandescent material being ejected at the summit were visible in webcam images during the week. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and visitors and residents of Lamawolo, Lamatokan, and Jontona were warned to stay 2 km away from the vent and 3 km away from the vent on the S and SE flanks.
Report for Dukono
PVMBG reported that the eruption at Dukono was ongoing during 5-11 June. Gray-and-white ash plumes rose 100-1,600 m above the summit and drifted E and W on most days; no emissions were observed on 7 June. The Alert Level remained at Level 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 3-km exclusion zone.
Report for Ibu
PVMBG reported that the eruption at Ibu continued during 5-11 June with occurrences of tall ash plumes. White, gray, and black ash plumes rose as high as 5 km above the crater rim and drifted in multiple directions during 5-6 and 9 June. White steam-and-gas plumes rose 200-1,000 m above the crater rim and drifted in multiple directions during on 29 May and 3 June. White-and-gray ash plumes rose as high as 4 km and drifted in multiple directions on 11 June. The Alert Level remained at 4 (the highest level on a four-level scale) and the public was advised to stay 4 km away from the active crater and 7 km away from the N crater wall opening.
Report for Kanlaon
PHIVOLCS reported that intense rain on 6 June mobilized ash deposited during the 3 June eruption at Kanlaon causing lahars to descend the S flank and impact local communities. The lahars began at around 1300 and lasted 25 minutes based on seismic data. They deposited cohesive gray mud, plant debris, and gravel in at least four stream channels including Tamburong Creek, which courses through Biak-na-bato and Calapnagan, La Castellana; Intiguiwan River in Guinpanaan and upstream Baji-Baji Falls in Cabacungan, La Castellana; Padudusan Falls, Masulog, Canlaon City; and the Binalbagan River, which drains the S flank of the volcano. Lahars overflowed parts of Tamburong Creek and deposited material a few centimeters thick along a section of the main road in Biak-na-Bato, making it impassable to motorists. Thunderstorms continued and channel-confined lahars on the S and W flank were detected the next day. The lahars began at around 1450 on 7 June and lasted 80 minutes based on seismic data. They were described as cohesive and cement-like and carried tree debris along the Baji-Baji Falls and Ibid Creek, in Cabacungan, La Castellana. Lahars also descended the Santo Guintubdan, Ara-al, La Carlota City and muddy waters were observed in the Buslugan, Busay Oro, Busay Abaga, Busay Mayor, Busay Kapid, Kabkaban, Ezzy, Busay Ambon, and Labi Labi falls. Voluminous gas-and-steam emissions rose 1.5-2 km above the summit and drifted NE and SW during 6-8 June.

A special notice was issued on 8 June due to elevated sulfur dioxide levels. During a field survey sulfur dioxide flux averaged of 4,397 tonnes per day (t/d) which was the highest level recorded so far this year and the second highest land-based measurement for Kanlaon. Sulfur dioxide emissions were elevated in 2024, averaging 1,458 t/d, though after the 3 June eruption the daily average increased to 3,347 t/d. Emisisons had decreased on 9 June, averaging 3,304 t/d. The rate of volcanic earthquakes persisted at above-background levels with an average of 33 events per day. Moderate steam-and-gas emissions rose 300-500 m above the summit and drifted NE and SW during 9-11 June. At least 1,237 families or 4,190 residents of five barangays remained in evacuation shelters according to a 12 June news article; many had health problems from exposure to sulfur dioxide gas and ash. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 0-5) and PHIVOLCS reminded the public to remain outside of the 4-km-radius Permanent Danger Zone.
Report for Taal
In a special report, PHIVOLCS noted that sulfur dioxide emissions were elevated at Taal, averaging 11,072 tonnes per day (t/d) on 6 June. Sulfur dioxide emissions have been continuously released since 2021 and averaged 8,294 t/d during 2024. Hazy or voggy conditions were reported at Alitagtag, Tingloy, San Nicolas, Laurel, Taysan, Lobo, and Batangas City, and were observed during field surveys in Agoncillo, Lemery, Taal, Santa Teresita, Alitagtag, Cuenca, Lipa, Balete, and Malvar.

Daily steam-and-gas emissions that were sometimes voluminous rose 1.9-2.4 km above the rim of Main Crater and drifted NNW, NW, SW, and SSE based on webcam images during 6-11 June. Two volcanic earthquakes were recorded during the week. During 7-8 June there were five periods of volcanic tremor lasting as short as three minutes and as long as 10 hours and eight minutes. A two-minute phreatic event was also recorded. Upwelling gases and hot fluids in the lake were observed during 8-10 June. Sulfur dioxide emissions averaged 2,470 t/d on 10 June. The Alert Level remained at 1 (on a scale of 0-5), and PHIVOLCS reminded the public that the entire Taal Volcano Island was a Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) and to take extra precaution around Main Crater and along the Daang Kastila fissure.
Report for Suwanosejima
JMA reported that eruptive activity at Suwanosejima's Ontake Crater continued during 3-10 June and produced volcanic plumes that rose as high as 700 m above the crater rim. Crater incandescence was observed nightly in webcam images. No explosions were recorded. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a 5-level scale) and the public was warned to stay at least 1.5 km away from the crater.
Report for Aira
JMA reported ongoing eruptive activity at Minamidake Crater (Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano) during 27 May-3 June with nighttime crater incandescence. Sulfur dioxide emissions were high, averaging 2,000 tons per day on 30 May. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale), and the public was warned to stay 1 km away from both craters.
Report for Ebeko
KVERT reported that moderate explosive activity was ongoing at Ebeko during 30 May-6 June. According to volcanologists in Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island, about 7 km E), explosions during 31 May and 1-2 June generated ash plumes that rose as high as 2 km (6,600 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE and S. A thermal anomaly was identified in satellite images on 30 May, 1 June, and 3 June; on other days either no activity was observed or weather conditions prevented views. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the third level on a four-color scale). Dates are UTC; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Bezymianny
KVERT reported that a daily thermal anomaly over Bezymianny was identified in satellite images during 31 May-6 June. According to the Tokyo VAAC an ash plume was identified in satellite images at 1350 (local time) on 5 June rising to 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifting E. The ash plume had dissipated by 1720 (local time). Dates are UTC; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Sheveluch
KVERT reported that thermal anomalies over both the new and older lava domes at Sheveluch were identified in satellite images during 1-2 and 4-6 June; the domes were obscured by weather clouds on 31 May and 3 June. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the third level on a four-color scale). Dates are based on UTC times; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Great Sitkin
AVO reported that slow lava effusion in Great Sitkin’s summit crater continued during 5-11 June. Seismicity was low with few daily small earthquakes. Slightly elevated surface temperatures at the summit were identified in satellite images during 4-6 June and diffuse steam emissions were visible in webcam images during 5-6 June. Weather clouds sometimes obscured satellite and webcam views. The Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch (the third level on a four-level scale) and the Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the third color on a four-color scale).
Report for Kilauea
HVO lowered the Volcano Alert Level for Kilauea to Advisory and the Aviation Color Code to Yellow on 5 June, noting that the fissure eruption that had occurred in a remote area along the Southwest Rift Zone on 3 June was unlikely to restart. Tremor, degassing, and incandescence associated with the fissure vents had substantially decreased. A sulfur dioxide emission rate of 5,500 tonnes per day (t/d) was measured at the eruption site on 4 June, well above background levels (100 t/d or less). Sulfur dioxide emissions decreased to 400 t/d on 6 June and likely continued to decline over subsequent days. Lava flows only covered about 350,000 square meters (0.35 square kilometers). Incandescence from the flow field was visible in webcam images, but decreased daily and was no longer visible by 10 June.
Report for San Cristobal
The Washington VAAC reported that ash plumes from San Cristóbal were visible in webcam images at around 1500 and 1700 on 7 June rising above the summit and drifting N. The plumes were not identified in satellite images due to weather conditions. According to a news report the ash plume rose 1 km above the summit.
Report for Reventador
In a special report issued on 10 June IG-EPN reported that the number and amplitude of explosions at Reventador had increased beginning on 21 March and remained elevated, based on seismic data. Additionally, during this period a slight increase in sulfur dioxide emissions was identified in satellite data. The daily explosion count peaked on 26 May and again on 9 June. IG noted that the characteristics of the ash emissions had not changed and remained at normal levels with plumes typically rising 1 km above the crater rim; plumes to 1.6 km indicate higher activity, and 2 km is considered notable. Since 2 May morphological changes in the crater area reflected the generation of small pyroclastic flows that descended the S and SE flanks but did not impact residents or infrastructure. Explosive activity during 2-3 June created a small ravine on the SSE flank and a 125-m-wide depression at the crater rim, at the head of the ravine. Incandescence at the SE part of the crater became visible and persisted. Subsequent pyroclastic flows were channeled down the ravine, reaching the base of the cone.

During 1-6 June the Washington VAAC issued 584 reports of ash emissions, or an average of two reports per day, according to IG. The plumes rose 400-2,800 m above the crater rim, averaging 1 km high. There were 62-85 daily explosions during 7-11 June. Weather clouds prevented views during 7-9 June. Ash plumes during 10-11 June rose 700-800 m and drifted WNW and NW.
Report for Reykjanes
IMO reported that the eruption that began on 29 May near Sundhnúk, NE of Sýlingarfell, within the Reykanes volcanic system, continued through 11 June. The lava field had an estimated area of 8.6 square kilometers and the erupted volume was about 36 million cubic meters based on a 3 June drone survey. The estimated flow rate during 29 May-3 June was 30 cubic meters per second. Only one crater was active by the morning of 4 June, and the flow rate had likely decreased. Lava flows advanced NW towards Sýlingarfell and S towards Hagafell on 5 June. On 7 June flows continued to advance N towards Sýlingarfell, causing the flow field in that area to thicken, and continued on expand N and W. Deformation data indicated that deflation had ceased. A small collapse of the crater wall was visible according to a news source. The rate of lava advancement increased during 7-8 June in an area N of Sýlingarfell, towards Grindavíkurvegur. By 1030 on 8 June lava had crossed Grindavík road just to the N of where work was being done to close a gap in an earthen barrier. Lava also moved along the barrier and in some areas flowed over the top. The flows had slowed by noon, reaching 800 m from hot water pipelines. Inflation began to be detected sometime during 8-9 June though the rate of uplift had not been determined. The eruption continued during 9-11 June. Lava continued to accumulate in a lava pond just SE of Sýlingarfell. Notable sulfur dioxide pollution from the eruption was measured in many parts of Reykjavík and in the W part of South Iceland. Vog was noticeable in the W part of the country during the morning of 11 June.