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Current Eruptions

Overall, 47 volcanoes were in continuing eruption status as of 28 October 2022. An eruption marked as "continuing" does not always mean persistent daily activity, but indicates at least intermittent eruptive events without a break of 3 months or more. Detailed statistics are not kept on daily activity, but generally there are around 20 volcanoes actively erupting on any particular day; this is a subset of the normal 40-50 with continuing eruptions. Additional eruption data is available for recent years.

The Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report (WVAR) for the week ending on 22 November 2022 includes the 20 volcanoes shown below marked "Yes" in the WVAR column (rollover for report). The most recently started eruption is at the top, continuing as of the Stop Date given. An eruption listed here might have ended since the last data update, or at the update time a firm end date had not yet been determined due to potential renewed activity. Complete updates are done about every 6-8 weeks, but information about newer eruptions can be found in the Weekly Report.

Volcano Country Eruption Start Date Eruption Stop Date Max VEI WVAR
Kerinci Indonesia 2022 Oct 15 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) Yes
Taal Philippines 2022 Oct 5 2022 Oct 23 (continuing)
Alaid Russia 2022 Sep 10 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) Yes
Ebeko Russia 2022 Jun 11 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) Yes
Chikurachki Russia 2022 Jan 17 2022 Oct 17 (continuing) 2
Kavachi Solomon Islands 2021 Oct 2 2022 Oct 27 (continuing) 0
Kilauea United States 2021 Sep 29 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 0 Yes
Pavlof United States 2021 Aug 5 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2 Yes
Rincon de la Vieja Costa Rica 2021 Jun 28 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Great Sitkin United States 2021 May 25 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2 Yes
Krakatau Indonesia 2021 May 25 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Merapi Indonesia 2020 Dec 31 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 1
San Cristobal Nicaragua 2020 Dec 27 (?) 2022 Oct 23 (continuing) 3
Lewotolok Indonesia 2020 Nov 27 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Sangay Ecuador 2019 Mar 26 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Tinakula Solomon Islands 2018 Dec 8 (in or before) 2022 Oct 23 (continuing) 2
Karangetang Indonesia 2018 Nov 25 2022 Oct 25 (continuing) 2
Nyamulagira DR Congo 2018 Apr 18 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 0
Kadovar Papua New Guinea 2018 Jan 5 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Ol Doinyo Lengai Tanzania 2017 Apr 9 2022 Oct 25 (continuing) 0
Aira Japan 2017 Mar 25 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 1 Yes
Sabancaya Peru 2016 Nov 6 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 3
Nevados de Chillan Chile 2016 Jan 8 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Langila Papua New Guinea 2015 Oct 22 (?) 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Masaya Nicaragua 2015 Oct 3 2022 Oct 25 (continuing) 1
Tofua Tonga 2015 Oct 2 2022 Oct 6 (continuing) 0
Villarrica Chile 2014 Dec 2 ± 7 days 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 1 Yes
Nevado del Ruiz Colombia 2014 Nov 18 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Saunders United Kingdom 2014 Nov 12 2022 Oct 9 (continuing) 1
Manam Papua New Guinea 2014 Jun 29 2022 Oct 10 (continuing) 2 Yes
Semeru Indonesia 2014 Apr 1 ± 15 days 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 4 Yes
Heard Australia 2012 Sep 5 ± 4 days 2022 Oct 22 (continuing) 0
Bezymianny Russia 2010 May 21 (?) 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 3 Yes
Reventador Ecuador 2008 Jul 27 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Ibu Indonesia 2008 Apr 5 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 1
Popocatepetl Mexico 2005 Jan 9 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Suwanosejima Japan 2004 Oct 23 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2 Yes
Nyiragongo DR Congo 2002 May 17 (?) 2022 Oct 24 (continuing) 2
Fuego Guatemala 2002 Jan 4 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 3
Bagana Papua New Guinea 2000 Feb 28 (in or before) 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Sheveluch Russia 1999 Aug 15 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 4 Yes
Erebus Antarctica 1972 Dec 16 (in or before) ± 15 days 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Erta Ale Ethiopia 1967 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 0
Stromboli Italy 1934 Feb 2 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 2
Dukono Indonesia 1933 Aug 13 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 3
Santa Maria Guatemala 1922 Jun 22 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 3
Yasur Vanuatu 1774 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2022 Oct 28 (continuing) 3
Report for Semeru
PVMBG reported that the eruption at Semeru continued during 16-22 November. White gas-and-steam plumes rose 100-200 m above the summit and drifted in various directions during 16-17 November. Emissions were not visible during 18-20 November, though weather conditions sometimes prevented visual observations. At 0608 on 21 November a white-to-gray ash plume rose around 400 m and drifted E. On 22 November white-to-gray ash plumes rose 300 m and drifted S at 0405, 600 m at 0503, and 800 m at 1541. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4). The public was warned to stay at least 5 km away from the summit, and 500 m from Kobokan drainages within 17 km of the summit, along with other drainages originating on Semeru, including the Bang, Kembar, and Sat, due to lahar, avalanche, and pyroclastic flow hazards.
Report for Kerinci
PVMBG reported that brown ash plumes from Kerinci, often dense, rose as high as 150 m above the summit and drifted NE, E, and SE during 16-18 and 20-21 November. Weather clouds prevented visual observations during 18-20 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale). The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 3-km exclusion zone.
Report for Bezymianny
KVERT reported that during 11-17 November a daily thermal anomaly over Bezymianny was identified in satellite images. Gas-and-steam emissions were visible and occasional collapses from the growing lava dome produced avalanches of hot material. The Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow (the second lowest level on a four-color scale). Dates are based on UTC times; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Klyuchevskoy
KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Klyuchevskoy was first identified on 13 November and was visible daily through 20 November. An explosive Strombolian eruption began at 2330 local time on 17 November, the same day that the thermal anomaly intensified. Gas-and-steam plumes drifted SE. The Strombolian eruption and gas emissions persisted; KVERT raised the Aviation Color Code to Yellow (the second lowest level on a four-color scale) on 20 November.
Report for Sheveluch
KVERT reported that the ongoing eruption at Sheveluch during 11-17 November was generally characterized by explosions, hot avalanches, lava-dome extrusion, and strong fumarolic activity. A daily thermal anomaly was identified in satellite images. Collapses generated hot avalanches and ash plumes that drifted 85 km ENE during 13-14, and 16-17 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale). Dates are based on UTC times; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Manam
The Darwin VAAC reported that on 20 November ash plumes from Manam rose to 1.8 km (6,000 ft) and drifted NW based on satellite images.
Report for Semisopochnoi
AVO reported ongoing low-level seismicity at Semisopochnoi characterized by intermittent seismic tremor and occasional low-frequency earthquakes during 16-22 November. Satellite and webcam views were mostly obscured by weather clouds, though during clear views continuous gas-and-steam emissions from the N crater of Mount Cerberus were visible. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch.
Report for Takawangha
On 18 November AVO raised the Aviation Color Code for Takawangha to Yellow (the second lowest level on a four-color scale) and the Volcano Alert Level to Advisory (the second lowest level on a four-level scale) based on increased seismicity. The number of small earthquakes detected near the volcano had increased during the previous few days and intensified during 17-18 November. The earthquakes were located at depths of 3-6 km below sea level with the largest magnitudes between 2 and 3. The seismicity possibly indicated magma movement at depth. The intensity of the seismicity was variable during 19-22 November.
Report for Great Sitkin
AVO reported that slow lava effusion continued at Great Sitkin during 15-22 November and the flow field continued to grow. Flow lobes extended about 600 m E of the vent and about 430 m S. Seismicity was low, with the occasional detection of low-frequency earthquakes. Satellite and webcam images were often cloudy through the week. The Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch (the second highest level on a four-level scale) and the Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Karymsky
KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly at Karymsky was identified in satellite images on 13 and 15-17 November. Gas-and-steam emissions persisted. The Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow (the second lowest level on a four-color scale). Dates are based on UTC times; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Ebeko
KVERT reported that moderate activity at Ebeko was ongoing during 10-17 November. According to volcanologists in Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island, about 7 km E) explosions during 12-13 and 16 November generated ash plumes that rose to 2.6 km (8,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted in eastern directions. Ash fell in Severo-Kurilsk on 16 November. A thermal anomaly was identified in satellite images on 16 November; weather clouds prevented satellite views on the other days of the week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale). Dates are based on UTC times; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Alaid
KVERT lowered the Aviation Color Code for Alaid to Yellow (the second lowest level on a four-color scale) on 17 November noting that activity had been gradually decreasing since the last ash plume was recorded on 26 October. A thermal anomaly continued to periodically be identified in satellite images when weather conditions permitted views, though the temperature of the thermal anomaly began decreasing on 29 October. Dates are based on UTC times; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Copahue
Based on information from Observatorio Argentino de Vigilancia Volcánica (OAVV), SERNAGEOMIN and SEGEMAR reported a minor increase of activity at Copahue. RSAM values based on volcanic tremor began to increase on 13 November. Weather conditions prevented views of the volcano during 13-14 November. On 15 November an increase in the magnitudes of tremor signals was accompanied by increased and denser gas emissions rising 200 m above El Agrio Crater. The emissions, seen in webcam images, were mostly whitish and contained particulate material. The Alert Level remained at Green (the lowest level on a four-color scale) and the public was reminded to stay 500 m away from the crater.
Report for Villarrica
During an overflight of Villarrica on 19 November, SERNAGEOMIN scientists observed a cone on the crater floor with an incandescent vent at its center, containing a lava lake. Deposits of ejected material were seen on the flanks. That same day a 75-minute-long series of volcano-tectonic earthquakes began at 1940. There was a total of 21 events located 7.8 km ESE of the crater. The largest event, a M 1.6, occurred at 2007 at a depth of 2.5 km based on data collection and analysis of Red Nacional de Vigilancia Volcánica (RNVV) and Observatorio Volcanológico de los Andes del Sur (OVDAS), respectively. The Alert Level remained at Yellow (the second lowest level on a four-color scale) and the public was warned that material could be ejected within 500 m of the crater. ONEMI remained the Alert Level Yellow (the middle level on a three-color scale) for the municipalities of Villarrica, Pucón (16 km N), Curarrehue, and the commune of Panguipulli.
Report for Pavlof
AVO reported that a minor eruption at a vent on Pavlof’s upper E flank was ongoing during 16-22 November and nearly continuous seismic tremor was recorded. Almost daily elevated surface temperatures were identified in satellite images; weather clouds prevented views during 21-22 November. Webcam images showed occasional minor steaming and minor ash emissions in addition to a recent mass flow and ash deposits on the upper to lower flanks visible during 15-16 November, and incandescence at the vent during 16-17 November possibly associated with lava spattering or fountaining. The Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch (the second highest level on a four-level scale) and the Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Kilauea
HVO reported that lava continued to effuse from a vent in the lower W wall of Kilauea’s Halema`uma`u Crater during 16-22 November entering the lava lake and flowing onto the crater floor. The active part of the lake remained at a steady level all week. The Aviation Color Code and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Orange and Watch, respectively.
Report for Ahyi
On 18 November the USGS reported that hydroacoustic and seismic signals suggestive of underwater eruptive activity at Ahyi Seamount had declined over the past week. No other signs of volcanic unrest were detected at the seamount.
Report for San Miguel
MARN reported that an eruption at San Miguel’s central crater began on 15 November, and by 1100 on 20 November a total of 62 phreatic explosions had been recorded, averaging 10 per day. An additional 24 explosions were recorded from 1100 on 20 November to 1100 on 21 November and 12 more were recorded between 1100 and 1100 during 21-22 November. Explosions generated gas, ash, and steam plumes that generally rose around 500 m above the crater rim, though at 1336 on 18 November and 1206 on 19 November eruption plumes rose as high as 1.1 km. Some of the events were accompanied by crater incandescence during 15-20 November. Sulfur dioxide emissions generally averaged 100-170 tons per day, below the baseline of 300 tons per day. Specific measurements during explosive events revealed that the emissions were sometimes higher; 1,200 tons per day was measured on 19 November during one of the largest explosions, and 378 tons per days was measured during an explosion on 21 November. Seismicity was characterized by volcano-tectonic events, long-period events, and tremor. Deformation data showed no significant changes. The public was warned to stay 2 km away from the volcano, and for those living within a 2-5 km radius to identify evacuation routes and to take preparation measures as guided by the Sistema Nacional de Protección Civil.
Report for Aira
JMA reported ongoing eruptive activity at Minamidake Crater (at Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano) and nighttime crater incandescence during 14-21 November. Sulfur dioxide emissions were slightly high on 14 November at 1,100 tons per day. Six eruptive events and four explosions (during 15-16 and 20-21 November) produced volcanic plumes that rose as high as 2.2 km above the crater rim and ejected large blocks as far as 900 m from the vent. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale), and residents were warned to stay 2 km away from the crater.
Report for Suwanosejima
JMA reported that the eruption at Suwanosejima's Ontake Crater continued during 14-21 November and crater incandescence was visible nightly. Eruption plumes generally rose 600 m above the crater rim and blended into weather clouds. An explosion at 0251 on 15 November ejected blocks 500 m from the vent and produced an eruption plume that rose 2.3 km above the crater rim and drifted SE. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale), and residents were warned to stay 2 km away from the crater.