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Current Eruptions

Overall, 46 volcanoes were in continuing eruption status as of 2 March 2024. An eruption marked as "continuing" does not always mean persistent daily activity, but indicates at least intermittent eruptive events without a break of 3 months or more. There are typically 40-50 continuing eruptions, and out of those generally around 20 will be actively erupting on any particular day (though we do not keep detailed statistics on daily activity). Additional annual eruption data is available for recent years.

The Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report (WVAR) for the week ending on 9 April 2024 includes the 20 volcanoes shown below marked "Yes" in the WVAR column (rollover for report). The most recently started eruption is at the top, continuing as of the Last Known Activity date. An eruption listed here might have ended since the last data update, or at the update time a firm end date had not yet been determined due to potential renewed activity. Complete updates are done about every 6-8 weeks, but information about newer eruptions can be found in the Weekly Report.

Volcano Country Eruption Start Date Last Known Activity Max VEI WVAR
Fernandina Ecuador 2024 Mar 2 2024 Mar 4 (continuing) 1 Yes
Ahyi United States 2024 Jan 1 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) Yes
Lewotobi Indonesia 2023 Dec 23 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) Yes
Marapi Indonesia 2023 Dec 3 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) Yes
Poas Costa Rica 2023 Dec 1 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) Yes
Shishaldin United States 2023 Jul 12 2024 Mar 1 (continuing)
Klyuchevskoy Russia 2023 Jun 22 2024 Mar 1 (continuing)
Mayon Philippines 2023 Apr 27 ± 2 days 2024 Mar 1 (continuing)
Kikai Japan 2023 Mar 27 2024 Feb 10 (continuing)
Etna Italy 2022 Nov 27 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 1 Yes
Ebeko Russia 2022 Jun 11 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Kavachi Solomon Islands 2021 Oct 2 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 0
Rincon de la Vieja Costa Rica 2021 Jun 28 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2
Great Sitkin United States 2021 May 25 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Merapi Indonesia 2020 Dec 31 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 1 Yes
Lewotolok Indonesia 2020 Nov 27 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Sangay Ecuador 2019 Mar 26 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Tinakula Solomon Islands 2018 Dec 8 (in or before) 2024 Feb 22 (continuing) 2
Karangetang Indonesia 2018 Nov 25 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2
Nyamulagira DR Congo 2018 Apr 18 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 0
Semeru Indonesia 2017 Jun 6 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 4 Yes
Ol Doinyo Lengai Tanzania 2017 Apr 9 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 0
Aira Japan 2017 Mar 25 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 1
Bezymianny Russia 2016 Dec 5 2024 Feb 22 (continuing) 3
Sabancaya Peru 2016 Nov 6 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 3
Langila Papua New Guinea 2015 Oct 22 (?) 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2
Masaya Nicaragua 2015 Oct 3 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 1
Tofua Tonga 2015 Oct 2 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 0
Villarrica Chile 2014 Dec 2 ± 7 days 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 3
Nevado del Ruiz Colombia 2014 Nov 18 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2
Saunders United Kingdom 2014 Nov 12 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 1
Manam Papua New Guinea 2014 Jun 29 2024 Feb 28 (continuing) 4
Heard Australia 2012 Sep 5 ± 4 days 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 0
Reventador Ecuador 2008 Jul 27 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2 Yes
Ibu Indonesia 2008 Apr 5 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 1
Popocatepetl Mexico 2005 Jan 9 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2
Suwanosejima Japan 2004 Oct 23 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2
Fuego Guatemala 2002 Jan 4 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 3 Yes
Bagana Papua New Guinea 2000 Feb 28 (in or before) 2023 Dec 14 (continuing) 2
Sheveluch Russia 1999 Aug 15 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 4 Yes
Erebus Antarctica 1972 Dec 16 (in or before) ± 15 days 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2
Erta Ale Ethiopia 1967 Jul 2 (in or before) ± 182 days 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 0
Stromboli Italy 1934 Feb 2 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 2
Dukono Indonesia 1933 Aug 13 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 3 Yes
Santa Maria Guatemala 1922 Jun 22 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 3 Yes
Yasur Vanuatu 1270 ± 110 years 2024 Mar 1 (continuing) 3
Report for Etna
A small vent at Etna’s Southeast Crater began emitting unprecedented quantities of volcanic gas puffs that formed vortex rings during the evening of 2 April. INGV issued a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation (VONA) at 2016 on 2 April raising the Aviation Color Code to Yellow (the second highest color on a four-color scale) due to increased signs of unrest. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Orange at 2030 because explosive activity at the summit craters was visible in webcam images; ash emissions were not produced.

A series of six explosive events were recorded by the seismic network during 1501-1510 on 7 April. Coincident with the seismic signals a four-minute-long, dense ash emission from Bocca Nuova Crater rose to 5 km a.s.l., or about 1.6 km above the summit, and quickly dispersed to the S. A VONA issued at 1018 on 9 April noted sporadic activity at the summit craters.
Report for Barren Island
Eruptive activity at Barren Island continued according to notices from the Darwin VAAC. Ash plumes identified in satellite images during 2-3 April rose 0.9-1.5 km (3,000-5,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW and W. Weather conditions prevented views on 4 April. A thermal anomaly over the summit was identified in Sentinel data on 30 March and 4 April.
Report for Marapi
PVMBG reported that eruptive activity at Marapi (on Sumatra) was ongoing during 3-9 April. White-and-gray ash plumes rose 250-1,500 m above the summit and drifted in multiple directions during 3-5 and 8-9 April. White steam-and-gas plumes rose 250-300 m above the summit and drifted E and SE during 6-7 April.

Lahars generated by intense rainfall were detected by the seismic network during 1400-1530 on 5 April. The lahars originated in multiple drainages on Marapi and damaged homes and infrastructure in parts of the Agam and Tanah Datar regencies including Bukik Batabuah and Aia Angek, and villages in the districts of Sungai Pua, Candung, and Batipuah. According to news articles at least two pulses of lahars damaged the Bukittinggi-Padang highway, causing it to be impassible for several hours. The lahars infiltrated about 65 hectares of rice fields, damaged 72 houses, and affected 38 businesses. In some areas, cars were stranded and some motorists were trapped, smaller roads were blocked, gas stations were impacted, and a few farm animals were swept away. About 270 residents were affected, and at least 68 were evacuated. Some residents were taken to the hospital, but no fatalities were reported. Based on field observations during 5-6 April authorities identified several rivers that had shallowed due to deposited material from the lahars and needed to be dredged so that they could flow normally and not cause further flooding. Efforts to remove the lahar and debris deposits such as tree trunks and branches was underway. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to stay 4.5 km away from the active crater.
Report for Merapi
BPPTKG reported that the eruption at Merapi (on Java) continued during 29 March-4 April. Seismicity remained at high levels. The SW lava dome produced 49 lava avalanches that traveled as far as 1.8 km down the SW flank. One pyroclastic flow traveled 1.7 km SW down the upper part of the Bebeng drainage. Morphological changes to the SW lava dome were due to continuing effusion and collapses of material. The volume of the SW dome was an estimated 2,054,600 cubic meters and the dome in the main crater was an estimated 2,358,200 cubic meters based on a 30 March drone survey and webcam images. The highest temperature of the SW dome was 243 degrees Celsius, lower than the previous measurement. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to stay 3-7 km away from the summit, based on location.
Report for Semeru
PVMBG reported that eruptive activity continued at Semeru during 3-9 April. Daily white-and-gray ash plumes rose 400-800 m above the summit and drifted in multiple directions. The Alert Level remained at 3 (the third highest level on a scale of 1-4). The public was warned to stay at least 5 km away from the summit in all directions, 13 km from the summit to the SE, 500 m from the banks of the Kobokan drainage as far as 17 km from the summit, and to avoid other drainages including the Bang, Kembar, and Sat, due to lahar, avalanche, and pyroclastic flow hazards.
Report for Lewotobi
PVMBG reported that white-and-gray plumes rose 50-200 m above the summit of Lewotobi’s Laki-laki volcano and drifted N, NE, and E on 6 and 9 April. White plumes rose as high as 300 m above the summit and drifted in multiple directions on 3, 5, and 7 April; no plumes were visible on 4 April. The Alert Level remained at 2 (the second lowest level on a scale of 1-4) and the public was warned to stay outside of the exclusion zone, defined as a 2-km radius around Laki-laki crater, 3 km to the NNE, and 5 km on the NE flanks.
Report for Lewotolok
PVMBG reported that the eruption at Lewotolok continued during 3-9 April. White-and-gray ash plumes rose as high as 350 m above the summit and drifted E and SE on 4 and 7 April. White emissions rose as high as 600 m above the summit and drifted in multiple directions on the other days. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the residents of Lamawolo, Lamatokan, and Jontona were warned to stay 2 km away from the vent and 3 km away from the vent on the S and SE flanks.
Report for Dukono
PVMBG reported that the eruption at Dukono was ongoing during 3-9 April. Gray-and-white ash plumes rose as high as 1 km above the summit and drifted SW, S, and SE during 3 and 7-9 April. According to the Darwin VAAC an ash plume rose to 2.4 km (8,000 ft) a.s.l., or about 1.6 km above the summit, and drifted SW on 4 April. Plumes were either absent or not observed due to weather conditions on the other days. The Alert Level remained at Level 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 3-km exclusion zone.
Report for Ahyi
Signs of unrest at Ahyi Seamount had not been observed in satellite images since 27 March when an area of discolored water was present near the seamount. Both the Aviation Color Code and the Volcano Alert Level were lowered to Unassigned at 0346 on 10 April due to the absence of activity and the lack of local monitoring stations.
Report for Ebeko
KVERT reported that moderate explosive activity was ongoing at Ebeko during 28 March-4 April. According to volcanologists in Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island, about 7 km E), explosions during 28-29 March and 1 and 3-4 April generated ash plumes that rose as high as 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S and SE. A thermal anomaly was identified in satellite images on 29 March and 4 April; on other days there was no activity or weather conditions prevented views. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the third level on a four-color scale). Dates are UTC; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Sheveluch
KVERT reported that eruptive activity at Sheveluch continued during 28 March-4 April with a daily thermal anomaly identified in satellite images. On 29 March a plume of resuspended ash drifted 65 km E. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the third level on a four-color scale). Dates are based on UTC times; specific events are in local time where noted.
Report for Great Sitkin
AVO reported that slow lava effusion continued in Great Sitkin’s summit crater during 3-9 April. Slightly elevated surface temperatures were identified in satellite images during 2-3 April. Seismicity was low with a few small daily earthquakes recorded by the seismic network; the network was not operational during 8-9 April. Weather clouds fully or partly obscured satellite and webcam views during most of the week. The Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch (the third level on a four-level scale) and the Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the third color on a four-color scale).
Report for Atka Volcanic Complex
AVO lowered the Volcano Alert Level for the Atka volcanic complex to Normal (the lowest level on a four-level scale) and the Aviation Color Code to Green (the lowest color on a four-color scale) at 0734 on 9 April. The report noted that activity at the volcano had decreased following the small explosion at the summit crater of Korovin on 27 March, one of the volcanoes at the complex. Though occasional small earthquakes and weak volcanic tremor continued to be recorded, the activity was at background levels.
Report for Santa Maria
INSIVUMEH reported that eruptive activity continued at Santa Maria’s Santiaguito lava-dome complex during 1-9 April with a lava extrusion and avalanches at the Caliente dome. Incandescence from the dome was visible during most nights and early mornings, and occasional incandescence was also present along the upper parts of the lava flow on the WSW, S, and SE flanks. Daily explosions (1-7 per hour on some days) generated gas-and-ash plumes that mainly rose 600-900 m above the summit and drifted as far as 20 km NW, W, and SW. The explosions produced block avalanches on the dome’s flanks and generated occasional, short-range pyroclastic flows that mainly descended E, SE, and SW flanks. Block avalanches from the dome and the margins of the upper part of the lava flow were also sometimes visible. Rumblings were occasionally heard. Ashfall was reported in San Marcos Palajunoj (8 km SW), Loma Linda (7 km W), Llanos de Pinal, and other nearby communities during 4-5 April.
Report for Fuego
INSIVUMEH reported that eruptive activity continued at Fuego during 1-9 April. Explosions were recorded daily, averaging 2-10 per hour on most days, when counts were reported. The explosions generated gas-and-ash plumes that rose as high as 1.1 km above the crater rim and drifted as far as 30 km NW, W, and SW. Explosions caused frequent, daily block avalanches that descended various drainages including the Ceniza (SSW), Seca (W), Taniluyá (SW), and Las Lajas (SE), and sometimes reached vegetated areas. Weak rumbling sounds and shock waves were reported on most days. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind during 4-7 April including El Porvenir (11 km SW), El Rodeo, Finca Palo Verde, Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW), Yepocapa (8 km NW), Santa Sofía (12 km SW), Los Yucales (12 km SW), Panimaché I and II (8 km WSW), and Morelia (9 km SW); ash possibly fell in La Soledad (11 km N), Acatenango (8 km E), Parramos (18 km NNE), and other nearby communities during 4-5 April. The explosions also ejected incandescent material up to 300 m above the summit during 5-6 April. In the afternoon of 8 April lahars descended the Las Lajas and Ceniza drainages, carrying tree branches, trunks, and blocks as large as 1.5 m in diameter.
Report for Poas
OVSICORI-UNA reported continuing emissions at Poás during 3-9 April. Vents on the nearly dry crater floor vigorously emitted plumes of gas and steam; ash was present in the plumes during 3-5 April and absent on the rest of the days. The plumes rose a few hundred meters above the crater rim and mainly drifted W, SW, and S and were often detected downwind in residential areas of Heredia and El Valle Central. Incandescence was visible from Boca A and Boca C during 3-4 April, and at Boca A during 4-5 April. A sulfur odor was reported in Heredia and El Valle Central during 3-4 April and in Sarchí on 9 April. Weather conditions sometimes prevented visual observations.
Report for Reventador
IG-EPN reported that a moderate eruption at Reventador was ongoing during 2-9 April. Seismicity was characterized by 46-78 daily explosions, long-period earthquakes, harmonic tremor, and tremor associated with emissions. Ash-and-gas plumes rose as high as 1.1 km above the crater rim and drifted NW, W, and SW during 2-4 and 7 April. Weather conditions sometimes prevented views; emissions were not visible on the other days of the week. Avalanches of incandescent material were visible most overnights, descending the flanks as far as 800 m from the summit. Secretaría de Gestión de Riesgos maintained the Alert Level at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Sangay
IG-EPN reported that high levels of eruptive activity continued at Sangay during 2-9 April. The seismic network recorded 1,106 explosions during 2-3 April and 20-411 daily explosions during the rest of the week. Gas-and-ash plumes rose 300-1,000 m above the summit and drifted SW on most days; weather conditions often hindered views during the week. Incandescent material descended the SE flank as far as 600 m during 2-3 April. Secretaría de Gestión de Riesgos (SGR) maintained the Alert Level at Yellow (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Report for Fernandina
Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG-EPN) reported that during 2 March-1 April an estimated 44 million cubic meters of lava had erupted at Fernandina, making the current eruption the largest in the last 15 years, surpassed only by the 2009 eruption. Fissure 13, located just below the crater rim on the upper SE flank, continued to be active during 2-9 April; the rate of lava effusion was about five cubic meters per second at least through 4 April, though the advancement rate of the distal end of the lava flow was variable. Sulfur dioxide emissions were generally at moderate levels, fluctuating between about 100 and 1,000 tons per day, though emissions were as high as around 1,650 tons per day on 4 April. Daily thermal anomalies over the lava flow continued to be detected and were variable in both number and intensity. The lava flows continued to advance down the flank and by 4 April were about 13.2 km long and about 1.3 km from the coastline. Based on observations from the Dirección del Parque Nacional Galápagos, the Ministerio del Ambiente, and Agua y Transición Ecológica the flows reached the ocean on 7 April. An 8 April satellite image showed plumes of gas and steam rising from the ocean entry.
Report for Reykjanes
IMO reported that the eruption along the fissure within the Reykanes volcanic system continued during 3-9 April. Two cones produced lava flows during the beginning of the week, but by 8 April only the larger, main cone was active. Lava flowed mostly S and the flows thickened near the crater and slightly to the S where the flows were most active. On 7 April lava filled the main crater, overflowed the crater rim, and cascaded down the cone’s flank. Part of N crater rim collapsed at 2130 causing lava to flow N; the lava built up a mound, blocking the path, and by the next day most of the lava again flowed S.

The average lava effusion rate decreased from about 6.6 cubic meters per second during 27 March-3 April to about 3.6 cubic meters per second during 3-8 April. During an overflight on 8 April observers confirmed that there had been a gradual decrease in the intensity of the eruption. The lava-flow field was an estimated 6.14 square kilometers with an approximate volume of 31.1 million cubic meters. Concurrent with a decrease in eruption intensity, inflation had accelerated. Seismicity continued to be at low levels and was concentrated between Sylingarfell and Stóra-Skógfell, and in the W part of Grindavík. Sulfur dioxide emissions continued to be high around the eruption site and were detected in residential areas downwind. On 3 April the Civil Protection Emergency Level was lowered to the middle level on a three-level scale. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).