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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-04720

The tuff cone at the lower center, seen here from the NW in 1978, dropped 280 m during collapse of the Fernandina caldera floor in 1968.  Collapse occurred in a piecemeal fashion over a period of about two weeks and the 110-m-high tuff cone, which previously formed an island in the caldera lake, rode the collapse downward without fracturing.  The tuff cone was later buried by a 1991 lava flow following a 1988 debris avalanche.  The prominent SE caldera bench is seen at the far side of the roughly 1-km-deep caldera. Photo by Chuck Wood, 1978 (Smithsonian Institution).

The tuff cone at the lower center, seen here from the NW in 1978, dropped 280 m during collapse of the Fernandina caldera floor in 1968. Collapse occurred in a piecemeal fashion over a period of about two weeks and the 110-m-high tuff cone, which previously formed an island in the caldera lake, rode the collapse downward without fracturing. The tuff cone was later buried by a 1991 lava flow following a 1988 debris avalanche. The prominent SE caldera bench is seen at the far side of the roughly 1-km-deep caldera.

Photo by Chuck Wood, 1978 (Smithsonian Institution).


Fernandina