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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-06036

At their northern terminus the 1984 lava flows form a dark lava field north of Krafla caldera.  The northernmost eruptive vents can be seen steaming at the upper left on September 10, about halfway through the two-week-long eruption.  The flat-topped peak at the upper right is Gæsafjöll, one of Iceland's many table mountains, which formed as a result of repeated eruptions through a glacial icecap. Photo by Michael Ryan, 1984 (U.S. Geological Survey).

At their northern terminus the 1984 lava flows form a dark lava field north of Krafla caldera. The northernmost eruptive vents can be seen steaming at the upper left on September 10, about halfway through the two-week-long eruption. The flat-topped peak at the upper right is Gæsafjöll, one of Iceland's many table mountains, which formed as a result of repeated eruptions through a glacial icecap.

Photo by Michael Ryan, 1984 (U.S. Geological Survey).


Krafla