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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-06036

At their northern terminus the 1984 flows form a dark lava field north of Krafla caldera. The northernmost eruptive vents can be seen steaming at the upper left on 10 September 1984, about halfway through the two-week eruption. The flat-topped peak at the upper right is Gæsafjöll, one of Iceland's many table mountains, which formed as a result of repeated eruptions through a glacial icecap. The Hliðarfjall dome can be seen as a peak in the middle-background, and Bláfjall and Sellandafjall table mountains are on the horizon on the left, about 50 km away. Photo by Michael Ryan, 1984 (U.S. Geological Survey).

At their northern terminus the 1984 flows form a dark lava field north of Krafla caldera. The northernmost eruptive vents can be seen steaming at the upper left on 10 September 1984, about halfway through the two-week eruption. The flat-topped peak at the upper right is Gæsafjöll, one of Iceland's many table mountains, which formed as a result of repeated eruptions through a glacial icecap. The Hliðarfjall dome can be seen as a peak in the middle-background, and Bláfjall and Sellandafjall table mountains are on the horizon on the left, about 50 km away.

Photo by Michael Ryan, 1984 (U.S. Geological Survey).

Keywords: lava flow | gas | gas plume | emissions | eruption


Krafla