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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-06298

Negit (right-center) and Paoha (far right) islands in Mono Lake are seen from Black Point, a basaltic cone on the NW shore of the lake.  The most recent eruptive activity from the Mono Lakes volcanic field took place 100-230 years ago, when lake-bottom sediments forming much of Paoha Island were uplifted by intrusion of a rhyolitic cryptodome.  Black Point is an initially sublacustral cone that formed about 13,300 years ago when the lake was higher.  The White Mountains form the far right horizon. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1997 (Smithsonian Institution).

Negit (right-center) and Paoha (far right) islands in Mono Lake are seen from Black Point, a basaltic cone on the NW shore of the lake. The most recent eruptive activity from the Mono Lakes volcanic field took place 100-230 years ago, when lake-bottom sediments forming much of Paoha Island were uplifted by intrusion of a rhyolitic cryptodome. Black Point is an initially sublacustral cone that formed about 13,300 years ago when the lake was higher. The White Mountains form the far right horizon.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1997 (Smithsonian Institution).


Mono Lake Volcanic Field