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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-07984

Volcán San Juan, the NW-most major volcano of the Mexican Volcanic Belt, displays an irregular profile west of the city of Tepic.  The northern wall of a 1 x 4 km wide, oval-shaped caldera that was created about 15,000 years ago forms the right-hand horizon.  The rounded notched peak on the center horizon is an intracaldera lava dome that was constructed shortly thereafter.  The flanks of Cerro Alto stratovolcano, the 2240 m high point of the San Juan volcanic complex, can be seen at the extreme left. Photo by Jim Luhr, 1976 (Smithsonian Institution).

Volcán San Juan, the NW-most major volcano of the Mexican Volcanic Belt, displays an irregular profile west of the city of Tepic. The northern wall of a 1 x 4 km wide, oval-shaped caldera that was created about 15,000 years ago forms the right-hand horizon. The rounded notched peak on the center horizon is an intracaldera lava dome that was constructed shortly thereafter. The flanks of Cerro Alto stratovolcano, the 2240 m high point of the San Juan volcanic complex, can be seen at the extreme left.

Photo by Jim Luhr, 1976 (Smithsonian Institution).


San Juan