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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-08296

The devastating mudflow of October 30, 1998 originated from a small debris avalanche produced when part of the summit ridge of Casita volcano collapsed during torrential rains accompanying Hurricane Mitch.  The source scarp, no more than a few hundred meters in length and a few tens of meters deep, is the light-colored area on the horizon at the upper left.  The proximal part of the avalanche, deposits of which are seen in the right foreground, scoured into deeply hydrothermally altered rocks in the middle of the photo. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).

The devastating mudflow of October 30, 1998 originated from a small debris avalanche produced when part of the summit ridge of Casita volcano collapsed during torrential rains accompanying Hurricane Mitch. The source scarp, no more than a few hundred meters in length and a few tens of meters deep, is the light-colored area on the horizon at the upper left. The proximal part of the avalanche, deposits of which are seen in the right foreground, scoured into deeply hydrothermally altered rocks in the middle of the photo.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).


San Cristóbal