Logo link to homepage

Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-08410

Frequent eruptions from MacKenney crater have kept the flanks of the volcano free of vegetation.  The summit of the cone towers more than 1000 m above its base.  The darker area at the lower left-center in this February 1999 photo is a September 1998 lava flow from a vent on the lower SW flank at about 1800 m elevation that bifurcated into lobes that traveled to the SW and south.  The lighter-colored area below the flow extending to the right margin of the photo is a 2-km-long debris-avalanche deposit formed when the summit crater rim collapsed. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).

Frequent eruptions from MacKenney crater have kept the flanks of the volcano free of vegetation. The summit of the cone towers more than 1000 m above its base. The darker area at the lower left-center in this February 1999 photo is a September 1998 lava flow from a vent on the lower SW flank at about 1800 m elevation that bifurcated into lobes that traveled to the SW and south. The lighter-colored area below the flow extending to the right margin of the photo is a 2-km-long debris-avalanche deposit formed when the summit crater rim collapsed.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).


Pacaya