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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-03995

A sequence of thin lava flows forms the upper part of the Pacaya NE crater wall. These basaltic lava flows were erupted during the final stages of an ancestral Pacaya edifice, which collapsed sometime between about 1,550 and 600 years ago to form a large horseshoe-shaped crater. The upper approximately 50 m of the wall is seen in this view with Cerro Grande, an older dome of Pacaya, forming the rounded peak to the right with the Cerro Chiquito cone to the left. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).

A sequence of thin lava flows forms the upper part of the Pacaya NE crater wall. These basaltic lava flows were erupted during the final stages of an ancestral Pacaya edifice, which collapsed sometime between about 1,550 and 600 years ago to form a large horseshoe-shaped crater. The upper approximately 50 m of the wall is seen in this view with Cerro Grande, an older dome of Pacaya, forming the rounded peak to the right with the Cerro Chiquito cone to the left.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).

Creative Commons Icon This image is made available under the Public Domain Dedication CC0 license, but proper attribution is appreciated.

Keywords: landslide scarp | exposure | outcrop | stratigraphy | geology


Pacaya