Guadalupe

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 29.07°N
  • 118.28°W

  • 1100 m
    3608 ft

  • 341006
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Guadalupe.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Guadalupe.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Guadalupe.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Guadalupe. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Guadalupe page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The Global Volcanism Program has no synonyms or subfeatures listed for Guadalupe.

Photo Gallery


The north-south-trending Guadalupe Island is seen is this 1991 Space Shuttle photograph. The shadow at the northern end of the island marks the scarp of a caldera cutting the northern of two shield volcanoes forming Guadalupe; the eastern rim of the caldera lies beneath the sea. The northern volcano is the younger of the two, and its caldera is partially filled by endogenous lava domes and viscous lava flows. The youngest activity produced a series of alkali basaltic cinder cones and lava flows.

Photo by National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA), 1991.
See title for photo information.
Steep sea cliffs forming headlands at the southern end of Guadalupe Island expose thick lava flows burying bedded pyroclastic rocks at the lower right. The southernmost of two major shield volcanoes forming the island is the oldest.

Photo by Al Segel, 1963 (courtesy of Rodey Batiza, University of Hawaii).
See title for photo information.
A buried valley filling lava flow sequence is exposed in the center of the photo in a cliff face on the west side of Guadalupe Island. Pyroclastic deposits from cinder cones formed along fissures cutting the southernmost of two large shield volcanoes forming the island are seen above the flows.

Photo by Al Segel, 1963 (courtesy of Rodey Batiza, University of Hawaii).
See title for photo information.
Ruggedly disssected Guadalupe Island consists of two large shield volcanoes, both of which have undergone caldera collapse. A younger volcanic series erupted from flank and fissure vents covers much of the island and fills their calderas. Pyroclastic cones were erupted primarily along fissures trending both NW-SE and NE-SW, although some lie along faults near the southern rim of the caldera of the younger northern volcano.

Photo by Rodey Batiza (University of Hawaii).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


The following 6 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections. Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description
NMNH 117622-1 Basalt
NMNH 117622-2 Basalt
NMNH 117622-3 Basalt
NMNH 117622-4 Basalt
NMNH 117622-5 Basalt
NMNH 117622-6 Quartz

Affiliated Sites