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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-01419

During summer the flanks Mount Fuji are visible with oxidized scoria and lava flows visible above the timberline. The two “shoulders” on the lower flanks, in this view from the north near Lake Yamanaka, are remnants of a group of older volcanoes over which the modern symmetrical volcano was constructed. The shoulder to the left is a remnant of Ko-Fuji (Old Fuji) volcano, and the broader shoulder to the right is a segment of Komitake, an earlier mid-Pleistocene volcano. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1970 (Smithsonian Institution).

During summer the flanks Mount Fuji are visible with oxidized scoria and lava flows visible above the timberline. The two “shoulders” on the lower flanks, in this view from the north near Lake Yamanaka, are remnants of a group of older volcanoes over which the modern symmetrical volcano was constructed. The shoulder to the left is a remnant of Ko-Fuji (Old Fuji) volcano, and the broader shoulder to the right is a segment of Komitake, an earlier mid-Pleistocene volcano.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1970 (Smithsonian Institution).

Keywords: stratovolcano


Fujisan