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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-03877

The rounded hills in the middle of the photo are part of a chain of lava domes of the Almolonga volcanic field.  Collapse of Almolonga stratovolcano sometime prior to 85,000 years ago formed a 3.3-km-wide caldera that is surrounded by a ring-dike configuration of dacitic and rhyolitic lava domes, seen here from the east.  The youngest and only historically active dome complex is Cerro Quemado, on the right-center skyline, right of conical Santa María stratovolcano.  The latest eruption of Cerro Quemado in 1818 produced a blocky 2.5-km-long lava flow on its east flank.    Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).

The rounded hills in the middle of the photo are part of a chain of lava domes of the Almolonga volcanic field. Collapse of Almolonga stratovolcano sometime prior to 85,000 years ago formed a 3.3-km-wide caldera that is surrounded by a ring-dike configuration of dacitic and rhyolitic lava domes, seen here from the east. The youngest and only historically active dome complex is Cerro Quemado, on the right-center skyline, right of conical Santa María stratovolcano. The latest eruption of Cerro Quemado in 1818 produced a blocky 2.5-km-long lava flow on its east flank.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).


Santa María

Almolonga