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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-04024

Tecuamburro, seen here from the north, is a small, forested stratovolcano or lava-dome complex of mostly Pleistocene age.  The smoother, left-hand side of the elongated volcano consists of younger lava domes that were constructed during the late Pleistocene or early Holocene within a horseshoe-shaped, east-facing caldera.  The caldera resulted from structural failure of the older Miraflores stratovolcano (right).  A phreatic tuff ring on the NW flank, Laguna Ixpaco, is of Holocene age, and is still fumarolically active. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).

Tecuamburro, seen here from the north, is a small, forested stratovolcano or lava-dome complex of mostly Pleistocene age. The smoother, left-hand side of the elongated volcano consists of younger lava domes that were constructed during the late Pleistocene or early Holocene within a horseshoe-shaped, east-facing caldera. The caldera resulted from structural failure of the older Miraflores stratovolcano (right). A phreatic tuff ring on the NW flank, Laguna Ixpaco, is of Holocene age, and is still fumarolically active.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution).


Tecuamburro