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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-04035

The elongated Suchitán volcano, seen here from the west on the rim of Retana caldera, is the highest of a cluster of closely spaced small stratovolcanoes and basaltic cinder-cone fields in SE Guatemala.  The large peak to the left of the 2042-m-high summit of Suchitán is Cerro Mataltepe; other cinder cones occur lower on the north flank.  One of the latest lava flows from Suchitán traveled through a low notch in the east rim of the caldera.  The flat-bottomed floor of Retana caldera once contained a lake, but now is used for agricultural land.   Photo by Lee Siebert, 1993 (Smithsonian Institution).

The elongated Suchitán volcano, seen here from the west on the rim of Retana caldera, is the highest of a cluster of closely spaced small stratovolcanoes and basaltic cinder-cone fields in SE Guatemala. The large peak to the left of the 2042-m-high summit of Suchitán is Cerro Mataltepe; other cinder cones occur lower on the north flank. One of the latest lava flows from Suchitán traveled through a low notch in the east rim of the caldera. The flat-bottomed floor of Retana caldera once contained a lake, but now is used for agricultural land.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1993 (Smithsonian Institution).


Suchitán