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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-04227

Laguna de Fria (center) is seen here from the west, along a ridge crest near Active Crater.  Laguna de Fria (also known as Laguna los Jilgueros) does not lie within a volcanic crater, but was formed when meteoric waters accumulated in a depression between overlapping cones of the Rincón de la Vieja complex.  The peak at the upper right is Rincón de la Vieja cone.  It is one of many peaks forming the elongated summit ridge of the Rincón de la Vieja volcanic complex, and its forested summit contains a roughly 700-m-wide crater.  Photo by Cindy Stine, 1989 (U.S. Geological Survey).

Laguna de Fria (center) is seen here from the west, along a ridge crest near Active Crater. Laguna de Fria (also known as Laguna los Jilgueros) does not lie within a volcanic crater, but was formed when meteoric waters accumulated in a depression between overlapping cones of the Rincón de la Vieja complex. The peak at the upper right is Rincón de la Vieja cone. It is one of many peaks forming the elongated summit ridge of the Rincón de la Vieja volcanic complex, and its forested summit contains a roughly 700-m-wide crater.

Photo by Cindy Stine, 1989 (U.S. Geological Survey).


Rincón de la Vieja