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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-04566

The Tahoma Glacier flows from the summit icecap of Mount Rainier between Liberty Cap (left) and Point Success (right) in this aerial view from the SW in 1969. The current summit was constructed within a scarp left by the collapse of the summit about 5,600 years ago. Slope failure of the summit or upper flanks of the hydrothermally altered volcano has occurred several times during the Holocene, producing massive debris avalanches and mudflows that swept into the Puget lowlands. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1969 (Smithsonian Institution).

The Tahoma Glacier flows from the summit icecap of Mount Rainier between Liberty Cap (left) and Point Success (right) in this aerial view from the SW in 1969. The current summit was constructed within a scarp left by the collapse of the summit about 5,600 years ago. Slope failure of the summit or upper flanks of the hydrothermally altered volcano has occurred several times during the Holocene, producing massive debris avalanches and mudflows that swept into the Puget lowlands.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1969 (Smithsonian Institution).

Creative Commons Icon This image is made available under the Public Domain Dedication CC0 license, but proper attribution is appreciated.

Keywords: stratovolcano


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