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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-04675

Two massive Galápagos shield volcanoes, their slopes darkened by young unvegetated lava flows that reach to the sea, appear in this space-shuttle photograph.  Fernandina volcano, the most active in the Galápagos Islands, forms a 30 x 34 km wide island with a 4 x 6.5 km wide caldera at its summit.  Darwin volcano, north of the midpoint of Isabela Island, has a 5-km-wide summit caldera.  The tuff cones of Tagus and Beagle are prominent along its western coast.  The light-colored area south of Darwin is the lower western flank of Alcedo volcano. NASA Space Shuttle photo, 1989.

Two massive Galápagos shield volcanoes, their slopes darkened by young unvegetated lava flows that reach to the sea, appear in this space-shuttle photograph. Fernandina volcano, the most active in the Galápagos Islands, forms a 30 x 34 km wide island with a 4 x 6.5 km wide caldera at its summit. Darwin volcano, north of the midpoint of Isabela Island, has a 5-km-wide summit caldera. The tuff cones of Tagus and Beagle are prominent along its western coast. The light-colored area south of Darwin is the lower western flank of Alcedo volcano.

NASA Space Shuttle photo, 1989.


Fernandina

Darwin