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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-05070

This vertical aerial photo, with south to the top, shows the symmetrical Graakula cinder cone at the lower left, which erupted about 4000 years ago and produced a lava flow that entered Selvallavatn lake.  The flow is part of the Ljósufjöll volcanic system, which is composed of a group of cinder cones and lava flows along short fissures on a roughly 90-km-long WNW-ESE line.  The latest eruption at Ljósufjöll post-dated the settlement of Iceland, and took place about 1000 years ago. Photo by Landmælingar Islands, courtesy of Jack Green (published in Green and Short, 1971).

This vertical aerial photo, with south to the top, shows the symmetrical Graakula cinder cone at the lower left, which erupted about 4000 years ago and produced a lava flow that entered Selvallavatn lake. The flow is part of the Ljósufjöll volcanic system, which is composed of a group of cinder cones and lava flows along short fissures on a roughly 90-km-long WNW-ESE line. The latest eruption at Ljósufjöll post-dated the settlement of Iceland, and took place about 1000 years ago.

Photo by Landmælingar Islands, courtesy of Jack Green (published in Green and Short, 1971).


Ljósufjöll