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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-05130

Soufrière St. Vincent volcano forms the northern end of the island of St. Vincent.  The 1178-m-high stratovolcano, seen here from off the west coast, has a broad summit.  The peak at the left, the volcano's high point, is the NW rim of a large crater created by a massive volcanic landslide.  The present-day, 1.6-km-wide summit crater truncates a cone (forming the flat-topped area across the saddle to the right) that was constructed within the earlier crater.  Several powerful explosive eruptions have occurred in historical time since 1718.  Photo by William Melson, 1972 (Smithsonian Institution).

Soufrière St. Vincent volcano forms the northern end of the island of St. Vincent. The 1178-m-high stratovolcano, seen here from off the west coast, has a broad summit. The peak at the left, the volcano's high point, is the NW rim of a large crater created by a massive volcanic landslide. The present-day, 1.6-km-wide summit crater truncates a cone (forming the flat-topped area across the saddle to the right) that was constructed within the earlier crater. Several powerful explosive eruptions have occurred in historical time since 1718.

Photo by William Melson, 1972 (Smithsonian Institution).


Soufrière St. Vincent