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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-05768

The classic Icelandic volcano Skjaldbreiður is one of many small shield volcanoes that were constructed along rift zones where the Mid-Atlantic Ridge rises above sea level. Skjaldbreiður, seen here from the W along Route 52, formed about 9,500 years ago during a single long-duration eruption at the southern end of the Prestahnúkur volcanic system in central Iceland. It produced 17 km3 of basaltic lava flows and is capped by a small 300-m-wide summit crater. Photo by Richie Williams, 1981 (U.S. Geological Survey).

The classic Icelandic volcano Skjaldbreiður is one of many small shield volcanoes that were constructed along rift zones where the Mid-Atlantic Ridge rises above sea level. Skjaldbreiður, seen here from the W along Route 52, formed about 9,500 years ago during a single long-duration eruption at the southern end of the Prestahnúkur volcanic system in central Iceland. It produced 17 km3 of basaltic lava flows and is capped by a small 300-m-wide summit crater.

Photo by Richie Williams, 1981 (U.S. Geological Survey).

Keywords: shield volcano


Prestahnúkur