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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-06875

Glacier-capped Cerro Capurata lies at the southern end of the Nevados de Quimsachata volcano group.  Quimsachata means "three" in the Andean Aymará language, and Capurata, along with 5730-m-high Humarata at the northern end of the chain and 6052-m-high Acotango in the center, straddles the Chile-Bolivia boundary along a roughly N-S line.  The 6052-m-high Acotango stratovolcano is the central and highest of the three stratovolcanoes, each of which may have been active during the Holocene. Photo by Sergio Kunstmann-Z (courtesy of Oscar González-Ferrán, University of Chile).

Glacier-capped Cerro Capurata lies at the southern end of the Nevados de Quimsachata volcano group. Quimsachata means "three" in the Andean Aymará language, and Capurata, along with 5730-m-high Humarata at the northern end of the chain and 6052-m-high Acotango in the center, straddles the Chile-Bolivia boundary along a roughly N-S line. The 6052-m-high Acotango stratovolcano is the central and highest of the three stratovolcanoes, each of which may have been active during the Holocene.

Photo by Sergio Kunstmann-Z (courtesy of Oscar González-Ferrán, University of Chile).


Acotango