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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-07213

One of the most impressive features of El Salvador is the scenic 8 x 11 km Ilopango caldera, filled by one of El Salvador's largest lakes.  The caldera, which has a scalloped 150-500 m high rim, lies immediately east of the capital city of San Salvador, seen at the upper left.  The latest collapse of Ilopango caldera resulted from the massive 5th-century CE eruption, which produced widespread pyroclastic flows and devastated early Mayan cities.  Post-caldera eruptions formed a series of glassy dacitic lava domes within the lake and near its shore.  Photo by Carlos Pullinger, 1996 (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales, El Salvador).

One of the most impressive features of El Salvador is the scenic 8 x 11 km Ilopango caldera, filled by one of El Salvador's largest lakes. The caldera, which has a scalloped 150-500 m high rim, lies immediately east of the capital city of San Salvador, seen at the upper left. The latest collapse of Ilopango caldera resulted from the massive 5th-century CE eruption, which produced widespread pyroclastic flows and devastated early Mayan cities. Post-caldera eruptions formed a series of glassy dacitic lava domes within the lake and near its shore.

Photo by Carlos Pullinger, 1996 (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales, El Salvador).


Ilopango