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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-07517

Thin wisps of steam rise from fumaroles at Laguna Caldera, within Amatitlán caldera.  In addition to the fumaroles seen here near the southern margin of the caldera, hot springs are located at several places along the shore of Lake Amatitlán in the center of the caldera.  This largely Pleistocene caldera has been the site of geothermal exploration because of its recent large silicic eruptions (the latest less than 23,000 years ago) and residual high heat flow. Photo by Pat Dobson, 1997 (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory).

Thin wisps of steam rise from fumaroles at Laguna Caldera, within Amatitlán caldera. In addition to the fumaroles seen here near the southern margin of the caldera, hot springs are located at several places along the shore of Lake Amatitlán in the center of the caldera. This largely Pleistocene caldera has been the site of geothermal exploration because of its recent large silicic eruptions (the latest less than 23,000 years ago) and residual high heat flow.

Photo by Pat Dobson, 1997 (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory).


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