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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-07856

The linear Santiago Bay in Lake Atitlán is the result of encroachment by the flanks of three post-caldera volcanoes into Lake Atitlán.  The narrow channel extends about 8 km to the low southern caldera wall on the center horizon and is about 1 km wide.  At the right are the slopes of San Pedro, the oldest of the post-caldera stratovolcanoes.  Contrasting eruptive styles produced the irregular shoreline in the left foreground consisting of lava flows from Tolimán and the smoother shoreline at the far left, formed by pyroclastic deposits from Atitlán volcano. Photo by Bill Rose, 1980 (Michigan Technological University).

The linear Santiago Bay in Lake Atitlán is the result of encroachment by the flanks of three post-caldera volcanoes into Lake Atitlán. The narrow channel extends about 8 km to the low southern caldera wall on the center horizon and is about 1 km wide. At the right are the slopes of San Pedro, the oldest of the post-caldera stratovolcanoes. Contrasting eruptive styles produced the irregular shoreline in the left foreground consisting of lava flows from Tolimán and the smoother shoreline at the far left, formed by pyroclastic deposits from Atitlán volcano.

Photo by Bill Rose, 1980 (Michigan Technological University).


Tolimán

San Pedro