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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-07923

The summit of San Miguel volcano was reported to be peaked prior to the 16th century, but now is truncated by a 1-km-wide crater.  This aerial view shows the 2130 m high point on the far NE crater rim in the center of the photo and several benches cut by a roughly 250-m-deep central crater.  The morphology of the crater has varied greatly during historical time as a result of the creation and subsequent destruction of new craters.  A cinder cone that formed in the NE part of the crater in 1884 had disappeared 50 years later.   Photo by Willard Parsons, 1964 (courtesy of Bill Rose, Michigan Technological University).

The summit of San Miguel volcano was reported to be peaked prior to the 16th century, but now is truncated by a 1-km-wide crater. This aerial view shows the 2130 m high point on the far NE crater rim in the center of the photo and several benches cut by a roughly 250-m-deep central crater. The morphology of the crater has varied greatly during historical time as a result of the creation and subsequent destruction of new craters. A cinder cone that formed in the NE part of the crater in 1884 had disappeared 50 years later.

Photo by Willard Parsons, 1964 (courtesy of Bill Rose, Michigan Technological University).


San Miguel