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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-07924

The northern slopes of the symmetrical cone of San Miguel are seen here from the city of San Miguel north of the volcano.  A deep crater that has been frequently modified by historical eruptions (recorded since the early 16th century) caps the truncated summit of the basaltic-to-andesitic volcano.  Radial fissures on its flanks have fed a series of fresh lava flows, including a NE-flank flow in 1762 that currently underlies the outskirts of the city of San Miguel, the third largest in El Salvador. Photo by Bill Rose, 1971 (Michigan Technological University).

The northern slopes of the symmetrical cone of San Miguel are seen here from the city of San Miguel north of the volcano. A deep crater that has been frequently modified by historical eruptions (recorded since the early 16th century) caps the truncated summit of the basaltic-to-andesitic volcano. Radial fissures on its flanks have fed a series of fresh lava flows, including a NE-flank flow in 1762 that currently underlies the outskirts of the city of San Miguel, the third largest in El Salvador.

Photo by Bill Rose, 1971 (Michigan Technological University).


San Miguel