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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-08218

El Valle de Antón caldera (left) is drained by the Río Antón through a notch in its SW caldera rim (right).  A late-Pleistocene lake occupying the caldera floor persisted until it drained sometime during the Holocene.  Cerro Cara Iguana (upper left) on the caldera rim is capped by El Hato pyroclastic-flow deposits related to formation of the caldera about 1.1-1.3 million years ago.  A well-preserved crater just out of view outside the SW caldera rim at the right was the inferred source of the India Dormida ignimbrite, erupted about 220,000 years ago. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).

El Valle de Antón caldera (left) is drained by the Río Antón through a notch in its SW caldera rim (right). A late-Pleistocene lake occupying the caldera floor persisted until it drained sometime during the Holocene. Cerro Cara Iguana (upper left) on the caldera rim is capped by El Hato pyroclastic-flow deposits related to formation of the caldera about 1.1-1.3 million years ago. A well-preserved crater just out of view outside the SW caldera rim at the right was the inferred source of the India Dormida ignimbrite, erupted about 220,000 years ago.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).


El Valle