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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-08472

The twin rounded peaks on the left horizon 700 m below and 1 km NE of the summit of Colima are the El Volcancito lava-dome complex.  The birth of El Volcancito took place on June 12, 1869 following large explosive eruptions.  A blister-like deformation had been visible with the naked eye since March 19.  Eruption of 0.21 cu km of lava at Volcancito filled the NE part of the caldera, and lava flows from Volcancito flowed to the ESE and ENE over the caldera rim. Photo by Guillermo Castellano, 1990 (courtesy of Jim Luhr, Smithsonian Institution).

The twin rounded peaks on the left horizon 700 m below and 1 km NE of the summit of Colima are the El Volcancito lava-dome complex. The birth of El Volcancito took place on June 12, 1869 following large explosive eruptions. A blister-like deformation had been visible with the naked eye since March 19. Eruption of 0.21 cu km of lava at Volcancito filled the NE part of the caldera, and lava flows from Volcancito flowed to the ESE and ENE over the caldera rim.

Photo by Guillermo Castellano, 1990 (courtesy of Jim Luhr, Smithsonian Institution).


Colima