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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-08588

The sharp-topped summit pyramid of Nevado de Colima volcano, the highest peak in western México, has been extensively eroded by glaciers, exposing steeply dipping lava flows.  This cone is seen here from the northern rim of Nevado de Colima's outer caldera, which is cut on its NW side by a younger caldera.  The younger 5-km-wide caldera was formed during the late Pleistocene as a result of massive collapse of the Nevado II edifice. Photo by Lee Siebert, 2000 (Smithsonian Institution).

The sharp-topped summit pyramid of Nevado de Colima volcano, the highest peak in western México, has been extensively eroded by glaciers, exposing steeply dipping lava flows. This cone is seen here from the northern rim of Nevado de Colima's outer caldera, which is cut on its NW side by a younger caldera. The younger 5-km-wide caldera was formed during the late Pleistocene as a result of massive collapse of the Nevado II edifice.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2000 (Smithsonian Institution).


Colima