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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-10056

The brownish area extending across the center of the photo is the Teixcal lava flow.  Originating during an eruption in 1722 from the base of San Marcelino cinder cone (out of view to the right) on the SE flank of Santa Ana volcano, the flow traveled 13 km to the east to the edge of the Zapotitán basin and destroyed the village of San Juan Tecpán, burying about 15 sq km of prime agricultural land.  Numerous elongated trenches on the surface of the blocky basaltic lava flow may mark the collapsed roofs of lava tubes. Photo by Lee Siebert, 2002 (Smithsonian Institution).

The brownish area extending across the center of the photo is the Teixcal lava flow. Originating during an eruption in 1722 from the base of San Marcelino cinder cone (out of view to the right) on the SE flank of Santa Ana volcano, the flow traveled 13 km to the east to the edge of the Zapotitán basin and destroyed the village of San Juan Tecpán, burying about 15 sq km of prime agricultural land. Numerous elongated trenches on the surface of the blocky basaltic lava flow may mark the collapsed roofs of lava tubes.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2002 (Smithsonian Institution).


Santa Ana