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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-10273

An ash plume from Popocatépetl volcano on January 23, 2001 is blown to the south.  The plume reached more than 9 km above sea level.  Larger explosions the day before had produced plumes that rose 8 km above the 5426-m-high summit and pyroclastic flows that swept 4-6 km down the north flank.  The large dark-colored area below and to the left of the volcano is a voluminous prehistorical lava field.  Elongated Iztaccíhuatl volcano, its summit capped by snow, is visible at the lower right.  Image courtesy of Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov).

An ash plume from Popocatépetl volcano on January 23, 2001 is blown to the south. The plume reached more than 9 km above sea level. Larger explosions the day before had produced plumes that rose 8 km above the 5426-m-high summit and pyroclastic flows that swept 4-6 km down the north flank. The large dark-colored area below and to the left of the volcano is a voluminous prehistorical lava field. Elongated Iztaccíhuatl volcano, its summit capped by snow, is visible at the lower right.

Image courtesy of Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov).


Popocatépetl

Iztaccíhuatl