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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-10699

An E-W-trending chain of volcanoes extends ca. 30 km across eastern El Salvador.  The small light-colored dot at the left is Laguna de Alegria, a crater of the Tecapa volcanic complex.  No historical eruptions are known from the eroded Usulután and El Tigre volcanoes.  The 2-km-wide Laguna Seca el Pacayal caldera is a prominent feature of Chinameca volcano.  San Miguel is one of El Salvador's most active volcanoes; the dark area at the lower right is a lava flow from the 1819 eruption.  The city of San Miguel is at the upper right. NASA Space Shuttle image STS61C-31-47, 1986 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).

An E-W-trending chain of volcanoes extends ca. 30 km across eastern El Salvador. The small light-colored dot at the left is Laguna de Alegria, a crater of the Tecapa volcanic complex. No historical eruptions are known from the eroded Usulután and El Tigre volcanoes. The 2-km-wide Laguna Seca el Pacayal caldera is a prominent feature of Chinameca volcano. San Miguel is one of El Salvador's most active volcanoes; the dark area at the lower right is a lava flow from the 1819 eruption. The city of San Miguel is at the upper right.

NASA Space Shuttle image STS61C-31-47, 1986 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).


Chinameca

Usulután

San Miguel

Tecapa

Tigre, El