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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-10773

A large eruption took place from San Miguel in 1699, accompanied by strong earthquakes, flames, and rumblings.  A major lava flow (right-center) traveled from SE-flank fissures for a straight-line distance of nearly 9 km.  The flow divided around a light-colored kipuka and then banked against Pleistocene volcanic hills, where it was deflected to the south in a narrow lobe to the point labeled "X."  The 2.5-km-wide caldera of Chinameca volcano lies across a saddle from San Miguel in this Space Shuttle image with north to the upper left.  NASA Space Shuttle image STS61C-31-47, 1986 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).

A large eruption took place from San Miguel in 1699, accompanied by strong earthquakes, flames, and rumblings. A major lava flow (right-center) traveled from SE-flank fissures for a straight-line distance of nearly 9 km. The flow divided around a light-colored kipuka and then banked against Pleistocene volcanic hills, where it was deflected to the south in a narrow lobe to the point labeled "X." The 2.5-km-wide caldera of Chinameca volcano lies across a saddle from San Miguel in this Space Shuttle image with north to the upper left.

NASA Space Shuttle image STS61C-31-47, 1986 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).


San Miguel