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Report on Sheveluch (Russia) — February 2003


Sheveluch

Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network, vol. 28, no. 2 (February 2003)
Managing Editor: Edward Venzke.

Sheveluch (Russia) Continued lava dome growth, short-lived explosions, and seismicity

Please cite this report as:

Global Volcanism Program, 2003. Report on Sheveluch (Russia) (Venzke, E., ed.). Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network, 28:2. Smithsonian Institution. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.GVP.BGVN200302-300270



Sheveluch

Russia

56.653°N, 161.36°E; summit elev. 3283 m

All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


During mid-September 2002 through February 2003 at Shiveluch, a lava dome continued to grow in the active crater. Short-lived explosions generally sent gas-steam plumes tens of meters to ~3 km above the dome. Seismicity remained above background levels. Earthquakes with magnitudes of ~2-2.7, as well as many smaller ones, occurred at depths of 0-6 km (table 5). Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery (table 6). Intermittent spasmodic tremor with amplitudes of 0.3-1.3 x 106 mps occurred throughout the report period.

Table 5. Earthquakes, explosions, and plumes at Shiveluch during 26 September 2002 through February 2003. Courtesy KVERT.

Date Earthquakes Magnitude Explosions Plume height above dome
26 Sep-04 Oct 2002 11 2-2.7 38 1-2.5 km
04 Oct-11 Oct 2002 7 2-2.4 16 1-2 km
11 Oct-18 Oct 2002 4 2-2.2 13 1-2.5 km
18 Oct-25 Oct 2002 -- -- 10 1.0 km
25 Oct-01 Nov 2002 -- -- 8 2 km
01 Nov-08 Nov 2002 -- -- 7 2-3 km
11 Nov 2002 6 2.0-2.4 -- --
11 Nov-14 Nov 2002 5 2.0-2.4 7 2-3 km
14 Nov-20 Nov 2002 6 2.0 19 2-3 km
22 Nov-29 Nov 2002 2 1.9 8 1-2 km
29 Nov-06 Dec 2002 -- -- 9 1-2 km
06 Dec-13 Dec 2002 3 1.7-2.3 8 1-2 km
13 Dec-20 Dec 2002 1 1.8 7 1-2 km
20 Dec-27 Dec 2002 -- -- 6 2-3 km
27 Dec-03 Jan 2003 -- -- 25 2 km
03 Jan-10 Jan 2003 -- -- 11 1.5 km
10 Jan-17 Jan 2003 -- -- 12 2 km
17 Jan-24 Jan 2003 -- -- 11 2 km
31 Jan-07 Feb 2003 6 1.6-2.5 -- 1.5 km
07 Feb-14 Feb 2003 -- -- 10 1.0 km
14 Feb-21 Feb 2003 -- -- 17 1.5 km
21 Feb-28 Feb 2003 1 2.1 14 3.0 km

Table 6. Plumes at Shiveluch visible on satellite imagery during October 2002 through February 2003. Courtesy KVERT.

Date Number of pixels Max band-3 temp. (°C) Background (°C) Comment
02 Oct 2002 2-3 40.46-45.48 ~-10 to -3 A 15 km faint plume extended to the SE
27 and 30 Sep, 01-03 Oct 2002 2-4 -- -- On 2 October, an 80-km plume extending to the SE was observed in a NOAA16 image
05 Oct-07 Oct 2002 2-8 36.81-49.35 ?-14-0 On 6 October, a 111-km plume extended to the SE
09 Oct-10 Oct 2002 2-8 -- -- --
11 Oct-13 Oct 2002 2 15-49 -19 to -6 --
12 Oct-14 Oct 2002 2-3 -- -- --
21-22, 24-25 Oct 2002 1-8 33-49 -20 to -1 On 22 October a faint plume extended 125 km to the SE
21 Oct-24 Oct 2002 1-5 -- -- NOAA12, NOAA16, and MODIS imagery
27 Oct-30 Oct 2002 2-6 17-36 -22 to -6 AVHRR
27 Oct-30 Oct 2002 2-6 -- -- NOAA12, NOAA16, MODIS
08 Nov-09 Nov 2002 2-4 34-49 -20 to -4 AVHRR; On 8 November a faint ~11-km-long plume extended to the SE, visible on band-3
08 Nov and 09 Nov 2002 4, 9 -- -- MODIS
08 Nov-11 Nov 2002 2-4 -- -- NOAA12 and NOAA16
11 and 13 Nov 2002 4-5 40-49 -18 to -10 AVHRR
11-13 Nov 2002 2-5 -- -- NOAA12 and NOAA16
13 Nov 2002 4 -- -- MODIS from Sakhalin
16-19, 22 Nov 2002 2-6 2-49 -26 to -20 AVHRR and MODIS; On 17-18 November, 20-km and 70-km-long gas-steam plumes extended to the WNW and SSE, respectively
23, 25-27 Nov 2002 1-5 1-49 -27 to -20 AVHRR and MODIS; on 27 November a 150-km-long gas-steam plume extended to the NE
29 Nov-05 Dec 2002 2-5 -1 to 49 -31 to -20 AVHRR and MODIS; on 29 November, a possible steam-gas plume extended 80 km to the SSE
01 and 05 Dec 2002 -- -- -- Gas-and-steam plumes extended 40 km and 45 km to the ENE and NNW
09 Dec-12 Dec 2002 2-6 3-39 -29 to -20 AVHRR and MODIS
13-17 and 19-20 Dec 2002 1-6 -15 to 49 -34 to -25 AVHRR and MODIS
19-20 and 23-25 Dec 2002 1-6 10-40 -27 to -23 --
27, 29, 31 Dec and 01-02 Jan 2003 2-4 -7 to 34 -38 to -30 On 1 January, a 10+ km plume extending ESE was visible on MODIS imagery
03 Jan-10 Jan 2003 1-6 -8 to 47.5 -30 to -13 --
10-13 and 15 Jan 2003 1-7 12-47.5 -33 to -20 --
17-22 and 24 Jan 2003 1-4 -2 to 19 -27 to -20 --
25-29 Jan 2003 2-7 -2 to 46 -25 to -15 --
01-06 Feb 2003 2-6 3-49 -24 to -9 Gas-steam plumes extended ~40 km to the W and NNE from the dome on 1 and 3 Feb, respectively
07-13 Feb 2003 1-7 -12 to 49 -30 to -12 Gas-steam plume extended ~35 km NNW from the dome on 9 Feb
14-20 Feb 2003 1-6 26-49 -33 to 5 On 15 Feb a wide gas-steam plume extended > 25 km E; on 16 Feb a narrow plume extended 110 km N; during 16-17 Feb ash and pyroclastic deposits were noted from the S to E slopes; a gas-steam plume extended 30 km W on 19 Feb; a gas-steam plume extended up to 96 km SSW on 20 Feb
21-28 Feb 2003 2-6 21-49 -30 to -8 Gas-steam plumes extended up to 50 km to the SSW, SE, and NE during 24-27 Feb

Incandescence was observed at the lava dome on 6 October. On 11 November, seismic data indicated possible hot avalanches sending clouds up to 5.5 km above the dome.

During late November and early December, gas-and-steam plumes extended >10 km to the E and W. On 19 December, short-lived explosions at 1238 and 1514 sent gas-ash plumes to ~5.5 km and 5.0 km altitude, respectively. In the first case, pyroclastic flows moved to the SE; in the second, to the S, inside the Baidarnaya river. The runout of both pyroclastic flows was 3 km.

On 28 December 2002, a small amount of light-gray ash was observed on the surface of snow. During early January 2003, plumes extended >5-10 km to the W and NW. During late February, plumes extended 10-40 km to the SW, S, and SE. Ash was noted in plumes on 24 October, 1, 11, 15, 19, and 20 November, 1, 19, and 24 December, 4 and 25 January, and 15, 17, 25, and 26 February. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Geological Summary. The high, isolated massif of Sheveluch volcano (also spelled Shiveluch) rises above the lowlands NNE of the Kliuchevskaya volcano group. The 1300 km3 volcano is one of Kamchatka's largest and most active volcanic structures. The summit of roughly 65,000-year-old Stary Shiveluch is truncated by a broad 9-km-wide late-Pleistocene caldera breached to the south. Many lava domes dot its outer flanks. The Molodoy Shiveluch lava dome complex was constructed during the Holocene within the large horseshoe-shaped caldera; Holocene lava dome extrusion also took place on the flanks of Stary Shiveluch. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred during the Holocene, making it the most vigorous andesitic volcano of the Kuril-Kamchatka arc. Widespread tephra layers from these eruptions have provided valuable time markers for dating volcanic events in Kamchatka. Frequent collapses of dome complexes, most recently in 1964, have produced debris avalanches whose deposits cover much of the floor of the breached caldera.

Information Contacts: Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT), Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry, Piip Ave. 9, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, 683006, Russia; Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of a) U.S. Geological Survey, 4200 University Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508-4667, USA (URL: http://www.avo.alaska.edu/), b) Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, PO Box 757320, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320, USA, and c) Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, 794 University Ave., Suite 200, Fairbanks, AK 99709, USA.