Paka

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 0.92°N
  • 36.18°E

  • 1697 m
    5566 ft

  • 222053
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Paka.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Paka.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Paka.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History


There is data available for 1 Holocene eruptive periods.


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
7550 BCE ± 2000 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Ar/Ar

Deformation History


There is data available for 1 deformation periods. Expand each entry for additional details.


Deformation during 2006 May 29 - 2007 Mar 05 [Uplift; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 2006 May 29 Stop Date: 2007 Mar 05 Direction: Uplift Method: InSAR
Magnitude: 21.000 cm Spatial Extent: Unknown Latitude: Unknown Longitude: Unknown

Remarks: An inflation episode at Paka volcano results in 21 cm of uplift.

Inflation episode at Paka, 2006?2007. A: Stack of interferograms spanning the entire event showing the total 21 cm of uplift. B: Interferograms covering short timer periods showing precursor uplift and subsidence at a second source located ~4 km south of the main event. Uplift of the main source occurred in two consecutive interferograms. Source locations are marked by white circles; red (+)?uplift; blue (?)?subsidence. C: Best-fitting source models. Two candidate source geometries are used for each event: a Mogi (point source), or horizontal penny-shaped crack. In all cases, the penny- shaped crack model provides a better fit to data, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Each color cycle (fringe) represents 2.8 cm of displacement in the satellite line of sight. rms?root mean square residual betweeen model and data. Each subplot has the same extent.

From: Biggs et al. 2009a.


Reference List: Biggs et al. 2009a.

Full References:

Biggs, J., F. Amelung, N. Gourmelen, T. Dixon, 2009. InSAR Observations of 2007 Tanzania Rifting Episode Reveals Mixed Fault and Dyke Extension in an Immature Continental Rift. Geophysical Journal International, doi 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2009.04262.x.

Emission History


There is no Emissions History data available for Paka.

Photo Gallery


Muruese (upper left) is a youthful breached pyroclastic cone on the lower SW flank of Paka volcano. It fed this spectacular lobate trachytic lava flow that is 2 km long and 2.5 km wide. The flow is bounded by steep-sided margins and displays prominent concentric pressure ridges. The dominantly Pleistocene trachytic Paka shield volcano in the Gregory Rift contains a small 1.5-km-wide summit caldera that is cut on the SE by a large explosion crater.

Photo by Hunting Aereo Surveys (published in Green and Short, 1971).
See title for photo information.
Trachytic pumice cones drape the upper NE flanks of Paka volcano in this aerial view from the NW. The dark-colored trachytic lava flow with well-defined flow ridges at the lower right traveled down the north flank of the volcano through a breach in the caldera wall. The 1.5-km-wide summit caldera is visible at the upper right, and a large crater to the SE appears to its left. Areas of brown vegetation are geothermally active.

Photo by Martin Smith, 1993 (copyright British Geological Survey, NERC).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


There are no samples for Paka in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

Affiliated Sites