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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-02574

A scoria cone on the western floor of the summit caldera of Veniaminof was the source of the dark lava flow that melted through the glacial icecap. This photo was taken from the SE on 15 June 1984, two months after the eruption ended, and shows the rim of the 8 x 11 km wide caldera in the background. The caldera rim contains Cone Glacier on the west side (to the extreme left) and is completely overtopped by glaciers on the south and SE sides. Veniaminof is one of the most voluminous and most active volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula. Photo by Alaska Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey, 1984.

A scoria cone on the western floor of the summit caldera of Veniaminof was the source of the dark lava flow that melted through the glacial icecap. This photo was taken from the SE on 15 June 1984, two months after the eruption ended, and shows the rim of the 8 x 11 km wide caldera in the background. The caldera rim contains Cone Glacier on the west side (to the extreme left) and is completely overtopped by glaciers on the south and SE sides. Veniaminof is one of the most voluminous and most active volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula.

Photo by Alaska Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey, 1984.

Keywords: eruption | lava flow | plume | gas | emissions | gas plume | lava | eruption | snow and ice | scoria cone


Veniaminof